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31 


1925 


un  11 

I 


: 


BRYN  MAW* COLLEGE 
LIBRARY 

THIS  BOOK  IS  THE  GIFT 

OF 
MILDRED  BUCHANAN  BA^ETT 


Digitized  by  the  Internet  Archive 

in  2011  with  funding  from 

LYRASIS  Members  and  Sloan  Foundation 


http://www.archive.org/details/brynmawrcollegey1925bryn 


The  Classbook 

Of  1925 


BRYN  MAWR  COLLEGE 


<§ertrube  €lp 

toljosc  Uinbness  aub  fncnblp  interest  habc  rontriuutcb 

so  mud)  to  our  pleasantcst  actibities  at  College, 

Mje  Class  of  1925 

bebtcates  tfjishoofe. 


The  Editors  do  not  hold  themselves  responsible  for 
the  opinions  expressed  in  this  issue 


Board  of  Editors 

Editor-in-Chief 
Adelaide  Margaret  Eicks 

Editors 

Maris  Sinclair  Constant  Elizabeth   Bailey   Lawrence 

Helen  Anastasia  Hough  (resigned)  Elizabeth  Gibbs  Mallett 

Janetta  Wright  Schoonover 


Business  Board 

Manager 
Elizabeth  Lane  Smith 

Assistants 
Margaret  Boyden 
Miriam  Grubb  Brown 
Margaret    Edwards    Gardiner 
Katharine  Elizabeth  McBride 


155350 


Freshman  Year 


/v"  A 


^mU    <A_*xJ.    {, 


Class  Officers 


President 

Vice-President 

Secretary 


1921-1922 


Elizabeth  W.  Austin 

Susan  S.  Carey  (resigned) 

Elizabeth  L.  Smith 

Virginia  C.  McCullough 


SELF-GOYERXMEXT  ASSOCIATION 
Executive  Board         .....  Mariana  Bonnell  (resigned) 

UNDERGRADUATE  ASSOCIATION 
Advisory  Board         .......  Adele  A.   Pantzer 

CHRISTIAN  ASSOCIATION 
Margaret  Stewardson 

THE  LANTERN 

Editorial  Board 

Edith  H.  Walton  Lysbeth  K.  Boyd 


THE  COLLEGE  NEWS 


Assistant  Editor 
Business  Board 


Margaret  Stewardson 
Jean  Gregory 


SONG  MISTRESS 
Helen  L.  Smith 


10 


Imaginary  Conversations  No.  1 
Giving  Girls  Knowledge 

G.  G.     "Come  in."     (Enter  a  Simple   Student).     "Oh   Miss  ,   what 

nice  little  tid-bit  have  you  for  me  this  morning?" 

S.  S.     "Er,  ah — Nothing  special.     I  just  wanted  to  ask  you  how  long  our  report 

'Mees ,  how  long  is  a  piece  of  string?" 


is  to  be." 

G 

G. 

S. 

S. 

G 

G. 

S. 

S. 

G 

G. 

S. 

S. 

G 

G. 

S. 

S. 

G. 

G. 

"Now  about  that  dropped  quiz, — and  a  very  nice  one  it  was." 
Softly)     "Well  'nice'  is  hardly  the — " 
"Your  answer  about  Venetian  society  shows  a  lamentable  lack." 
"Yes,  there  was  part  of  the  reading  I  didn't  understand  very  well." 
"Have  you  talked  of  this  with  your  mother?" 
"Nnno,  I  thought  you  knew  more  about  such  things." 

"I  recognize  the  value  of  experience  and  I 

as  I  hope  you  have  somewhat?" 
S.  S.  (Embarrassed)     "Y-Yes." 
G.  G.     "But,  on  the  other  hand,  the  value  of  voluntary — 

*,  you  understand?" 

S.  S.  (In  a  whisper)     "I  think  so." 

G.  G.     "You  are  old  enough  now  to  know *" 

S.  S.  (Hastily)     "But  about  my  quiz — ." 

G.  G.     "Yes,  about  that  last  more  abstract  question.     Were  you  absent  when 
I  lectured  about  the  Virgin  Martyrs  and —  — *even  in  married  life?" 

S.  S.  (Looking  down)     "I  was  there  but  I  didn't  quite  understand." 

G.  G.     "Now    in    the    Decameron — *    while    Aubrey    Beardsley *. 

Have  you *" 

S.  S.  (Blushing)     "Sometimes.     But  excuse  me,  I  must  go."     (At  the  door) 
"Please — my  little  sister  takes  your  course — please  remember  her  innocence — !" 

G.  G.     "The  value  of  purity  through  mere  ignorance —      —  *"     (Exit  S.  S.  in 
tears). 


*For  censored  portions  see  Appendix. 

12 


One  of  the  Thousand  Nine  Hundred  and 
Twenty-Five  Nights 

Co1l-ins  the  reporters,  make  way  for  the  press, 

While  she  her  sad  story  relates. 
The  Barber  was  Cummings  to  cut  off  her  tress, 

But  instead  the  Dean  showed  him  the  Gates. 

"Watts  this!"  cried  the  Gardiner,  who  found  him  outside, 

A-dropping  his  Potts  in  a  twinkling, 
And  Quarlesomely  said  to  his  blushing  Mc  Bride, 

"Of  your  meaning  I  haven't  a  Hinkling." 

In  packing  his  Gatchell  his  Pantz-er  forgot, 

Though  he  needed  them  Brad-ley  en-Hough. 
The  Shipley-ves  tonight,  and  though  Gail  there  is  not, 

In  that  Lytle  Brig  'twill  be  rough. 

His  Mc  Bride  and  the  Tinker  they  walked  o'er  the  Lee, 

A  Constant-ly  Hinton  young  man. 
"It's  Remak-able  how  you  can  Boross",  said  she: 

With  a  Mallett  he  Pierced  her  and  ran. 

Gre-gory  her  body  when  found,  And-er-son 

Had  her  tenderly  Fostered  with  Care — 
-Ey  carried  her  Shum-of  the-way,  and  when  Dunn 

He  Gritted  his  teeth  in  despair! 

"Oh,  where  can  I  Parker!"  he  wearily  cried, 

As  he  Saundered  along  in  the  drizzle, 
"I  Gless  I  Wil-soon  make  the  coffin — she's  died!" 

The  Carpenter  brought  him  the  Chis-el. 

Helen  A.  Hough. 


13 


The  Freshmen  and  the  President 


The  Freshmen  once  were  told  they  had 

To  give  a  little  show. 
They  wanted  very  much  to  make 

Their  first  attempt  a  go. 
But  what  the  thing  could  be  about 

They  really  didn't  know. 

The  Freshmen  sent  the  President 

A  copy  of  their  skit ; 
Expecting  she  would,  (like  themselves) 

Consider  it  a  hit, 
How  crushed  they  were  to  find  that  she 

Had  never  glanced  at  it ! 

The  Freshmen  and  the  President 

Talked  for  an  hour  or  so. 
The  Freshmen  wished  to  give  their  skit : 

The  President  said,  "No. 
Why  don't  you  give  a  circus  or 

A  nigger  minstrel  show?" 

"Or  if  it  has  to  be  a  show 

You  might  at  least  select 
"Such  scenes  as  would  appeal  to  our 

Superior  intellect. 
Such  drama  as  the  name  "Bryn  Mawr" 

Would  lead  us  to  expect." 

"With  lovers  known  to  history 
You  might  our  eyes  enthrall — 

Cleopatra  and  Antony 
(in  fitting  costume  all) 

And  Eloise  and  Abelard 
And  Virginie  and  Paul." 

"In  any  case  this  play  of  yours, 

As  I  perhaps  have  said, 
To  just  two  thousand  words  in  all 

Is  strictly  limited." 
Then  Ada  showed  us  to  the  door, 

We  staggered  home  half  dead. 


The  words  in  the  new  copy  which 

We  handed  to  P.  T. 
In  count  were  just  one  thousand  and 

Nine  hundred  ninety-three, 
And  all  the  while  we  knew  the  show 

Was  ruined  hopelessly. 

"I  weep  for  you,"  P.  T.  then  said, 

"I  deeply  sympathize. 
'Twas  hard  you  worked  so  hard  before 

The  plan  came  to  my  eyes." 
And  all  the  time  she  kept  us  down 

To  the  restricted  size. 

When  the  night  came  the  scenery 

Was  very  nearly  dry. 
The  electric  moon  was  shining  in 

The  lamp-black-darkened  sky. 
The  written  script  did  with  the  rules 

Most  studiously  comply. 

But  when  we  got  upon  the  stage 

We  burbled  all  we  knew. 
Stage-fright  prolonged  the  dialogue 

And  made  the  show  long  too, 
And  that  was  scarcely  odd  because 

We'd  said  the  whole  thing  through ! 

In  chapel  Monday  morning  we  were 

Sure  that  she'd  observe 
How  black  had  been  our  perfidy, 

How  terrible  our  nerve. 
How  wrong  we'd  been,  the  whole  of 

Our  first  version  to  preserve ! 

She  rose  and  she  commented  on 

The  costumes  in  our  play, 
How  much  by  means  of  scenery 

We'd  managed  to  convey; 
How  wonderful  it  was  how  much 

Two  thousand  words  will  sav! 


14 


One  Exciting  Night 

Produced  by  192.5 

Scene  1.     Mob  scene  of  cunning  Freshmen  facetiously  putting  spaghetti  in  the 

bedroom  slippers  of  1922  and  1924,  scattering  corn-flakes  and  statues  in  the 

beds,  exchanging  tooth-brushes,  etc. 
Scene  2.     Magnificent  ball-room  set  of  '22  and  '24  calmly  dancing  in  the  Gym. 
Scene  3.     Close-up  of  Elaine  and  Kay,  the  two  conspirators,  heavily  masked, 

carrying  a  sucking  pig.     They  hover  outside  6  Merion. 

Sub-title  .  .   (Pig)     "Ugh,  ugh.   ." 
Scene  4.     The  two  conspirators  dump  out  contents  of  Bee's  bureau  drawer,  and 

place  pig  therein,  upon  Bee's  best  teddy. 
Scene  5.     Close-up  of  teddy. 

Sub-title  .  .  "The  return  of  the  belated  revellers.   .   .   " 
Scene  6.     '22  and  '24  reeling  homeward.     Cut  showing  Elaine  and  Kay  hiding 

on  the  roof. 

Sub-title  .  .   (Elaine)  "Gosh,  it's  cold  as  Hell  up  here!" 
Scene  7.     The  crisis.     Bee  returns,  sniffs,  gazes  around  her  room  suspiciously. 

Suddenly  she  sees  the  half-open  drawer,  darts  to  it,  and  pounces  on  the  pig 

and  the  teddy  in  a  furious  state  of  mind. 
Scene  8.     Close-up  of  the  furious  state  of  mind. 

Sub-title  .  .  (Bee)  "!!*!        !!:!**!!-  -" 

Scene  9.     Caption.     "Came  the  dawn and  with  it  came  peace  to  three 

tortured  souls  on  the  bosom  of  the  great  outdoors  ..." 

Slow  fade-out  of  Kay,  Elaine,  and  the  pig  sleeping  on  the  roof. 


One  never  realizes  how  good-looking  one's  clothes  are  until  one  sees  them  on 
one's  room-mate. 


16 


IHHflHr           ^H^Hb 

pC      »H 

K                   1 

K> -W   «>>■ 

A            •         1 

Bv  •     1 

1     •     1 

■ 

%      t     1 

v  -  •    •    J 

A  dark  quadrangle, 

Silent, 

Its  face  open  to  the  sky. 

Cold  grey  cloister  walls, 

Hollowed, 

Mist)'  in  the  night. 

Noiseless  black  shapes, 
Dripping  of  water, 
And  the  fiat  crowded  roof 
Noiseless. 


"Pallas  Athene.  .  ." 

Through  the  dim  arches 

Song  swells. 

Mingling  of  many  strains, 

Beautiful  drop  and  cadence  of  a  chant. 

Noiseless  black  shapes, 

Swaying  red  flecks, 

Dip  and  surge  of  lanterns. 

"Pallas  Athene  Thea.  .  ." 

Bobbing  crimson  flecks 

That  stab  the  night. 

Slow  swaying. 

Silence. 

Sudden  cl  ink-clank-clink, 

Soft  murmuring  and  scuffle, 

Silence. 

"Sofias  Filai  ..." 

Clear  the  red  lamps  swing, 

Sharp  and  sweet  the  voices, 

Steady  the  beat, 

"Elpis  megalay  ..." 

Through  the  arches 

The  shadows  seem  stately. 

The  solemn  melody 

Sinks, 

Then  rises  from  without. 

"Sofas  Filai  ..." 

Edith  H.  Walton. 


ll^^T-^L^'^L^l/'NU 


Athletics,  1921-1922 


All- 

round  Championship  Won  by 
HOCKEY 

1922 

Captain — D.  Lee 

Won  by  1922 
Team 

Manager — L.  Voc 

E.  Lomas 
L.  Boyd 
D.  Lee 
M.  Mutch 

C.  Remak 

E.  Smith 

M.  Gardiner 

K.  Fowler 
E.  Austin 

L.    VOORHEES 

A.  Waterbury 

On  Varsity — D.  Lee,  M.  Mutch 


Captain — K.  Fowler 

L.  Voorhees 
M,  Mutch 


WATER  POLO 
Won  by  1922 

Team 

C.  Remak 

D.  Lee 

K.  Fowler 


Manager — D.  Lee 

E.  Austin 
E.  Baldwin 


20 


SWIM M INC.  MEET 

Won  by  1925 

( 'aptain — D.  Lee 

Team 

I).  LEE  K.  FOWLER  II.  KIRK 

M.  MUTCH  C.  REMAK  E.   BALDWIN 

E.  AUSTIN  E.  HAYNE  M.  BLUMENSTOCK 

Second  Place  in  Individual  Won  by  M.   MUTCH 

Third  Place  in  Individual  Won  by  D.  LEE 

College  Record  broken  by  1925 


TRACK  MEET 

Won  by  1925 

Captain— M.  CONSTANT 

Team 
C.  GEHRING 

E.  SMITH 


L.  VOORHEES 

M.  MUTCH 

K.  STEINMETZ 


E.  GLESSNER 
M.  CONSTANT 
D.  LEE 


Tied  for  First  Place  Individual— K.  STEINMETZ 


Captain — M.  Mutch 

S.  Anderson 
E.  Austin 
E.  Bradley 


APPARATUS  MEET 
Won  by  1922 

Team 
K.  Fowler 
D.  Lee 
M.  Mutch 


Manager — S.  Anderson 

H.  Smith 

K.  Steinmetz 

A.  Waterbury 


C.  Remak 
E.  Austin 


TENNIS 

Won  by  1922 

Captain — E.  Boross 

Team 

S.  Anderson 

On  Varsity — C.  Remak 


E.  Boross 
M.  BRO^VN 


Captain — E.  Smith 

E.  Austin 
C.  Remak 


BASKETBALL 
Won  by  1922 

Team 

L.    VOORHEES 

On  Varsity — C.  Remak 
21 


Manager — E.  Austin 

D.  Lee 

E.  Smith 


Sophomore  Year 


Class  Officers 


1922-1923 


President 

Vice-President  and  Treasurer 

Secretary 


Caroline  V.  Remak 

Helen  A.  Hough 

.    Miriam  G.  Brown 


SELF-GOVERNMENT  ASSOCIATION 
Treasurer         ........       Katherine  S.  Fowler 

Executive  Board  .....      Helen  A.  Hough 

UNDERGRADUATE  ASSOCIATION 
Assistant  Treasurer  ........    Adele  A.  Pantzer 

Advisory  Board         .         ...  .  .  .  .  Caroline  V.  Remak 


Secretary 


CHRISTIAN  ASSOCIATION 


Elizabeth  B.  Lawrence 


Secretary 


ATHLETIC  ASSOCIATION 


Dorothy  B.  Lee  (resigned) 
Elizabeth  L.  Smith 


Edith  H.  Walton 


THE  LANTERN 

Editorial  Board 

Lysbeth  K.  Boyd  (resigned) 


Constance  Miller 


Assistant  Editors 
Business  Board 


THE  COLLEGE  NEWS 


Emily  F.  Glessner 

Helen  A.  Hough 

Mathilde  Hansen 

Margaret  Boyden 


SONG  MISTRESS 
Etheline  H.     Hinkley 


24 


Now  It  Can  Be  Told 

One  can  tell  some  things 
On   verse's   wings. 

Others  one  can  discuss  in  plain  English  prose,  after  the  manner  of    Pater, 
Macaulay,  Henry  James,  or  the  Editorials  in  the  College  News. 
The  subject  in  hand  transcends  both. 
Therefore  I  sing  of  the  Countess  Cathleen 
In  contrapuntal  vers  libre. 

Scene  1.     Agreement. 

First  of  all  there  was  the  informal  class  meeting 

On  the  hockey  field 

When,  between  "Hireusousai  soi  deine" 

And  "Makarize,  aitoumen" 

The  class  agreed  to  give  it.     (It  never  pays 

To  be  too  agreeable !) 

Scene  2.     Employment. 

This  scene  is  laid  in  Merion  basement 
And  the  protagonist  is  banana  oil 
With  black  grease  playing  second  lead. 
If  we  were  members  of  a  Union 
We  would  all  be  suing  for  damages 
Because  of  injury  to  clothes  and  health 
Incurred  in  a  hazardous  occupation. 

Scene  3.     Presentment. 
While  it  was  going  on 

We  were  congratulating  ourselves  on  its  success. 
The  "gold"  in  the  spirits'  sacks 
Could  not  be  heard  to  rustle  like  dried  leaves 
Beyond  the  tenth  row  back; 

Cathleen  did  not  lean  against  the  black  screens  in  her  white  satin  frock ; 
The  Angel  did  not  step  on  a  thumb-tack 

(  his 
With   <  her  bare  feet. 

I  its 
We  allowed  the  audience  plenty  of  time  to  recover 
Between  acts. 

(We  even  gave  one  student  time  enough 
To  take  her  mother  to  the  station  and  get  back  again 
Before  we  began  Act  Three.) 

We  didn't  let  Miss  Kathleen  Kelley's  remarks  from  the  front  row 
Or  Dr.  Leuba's  flight 
Disturb  us. 
Consequently — 

26 


Scene  4.     Pronouncement. 

— we  were  surprised  in  chapel  Monday  morning 

When  Miss  Park  talked  about  Women  in  Industry  for  twenty  minutes. 

And  we  were  pained  when,  at  ten  minutes  past  nine, 

She  referred  parenthetically  to  our  play  as  "a  splendid  failure." 

Scene  5.     Resentment. 

The  Book-Shop  reports 

That  the  sale  of  Yeats'  books  has  fallen  oil'  100  per  cent. 

After  all, 

It  was  not  his  fault 

That  102")  thought  it  could  act  his  play.   .   . 


M 


enu 

Creamed  Chicken     .  .  ......  .50 

Baked  Beans  .....  .20 

Steak  and  Mushrooms       .....  .90 

Shirred  Eggs    ........  .35 

"Reading  from  right  to  left — " 


Imaginary  Conversations  No.  2 

Recitative  on  A  Flat 

A  timid  scratch  on  the  door. 

Miss  Swindler,  dejectedly — "Come  in." 

(Enter  flurried  student  with  her  finger  between  the  pages  of  Terence.  She  stumbles 
over  the  piles  of  envelopes  on  the  floor). 

Student — "Miss  Swindler,  I  didn't  quite  get  the  scansion  of  this  line."  (Here 
she  realizes  that  by  mistake  she  has  handed  Miss  Swindler  the  Handy  Andy. 
Hastily  retracting  it,  she  stuffs  it  in  her  stocking.) 

Miss  Swindler  (and  here  beginneth  the  recitative) — "Well,  sit  down  Miss 
Stewlett,  let's  see  what's  the  trouble  I  hope  you're  going  to  like  Pliny  I  had  an 
awful  time  getting  Dr.  Wheeler  to  give  up  Cicero  I  said  to  him  for  goodness  sake 
why  don't  you  tell  me  ten  minutes  ahead  of  time  what  you're  planning  to  give  your 
classes  I  never  know  what  he's  doing  and  I  never  can  find  him.  I've  never  had 
such  a  poor  class  as  this  year's  and  as  for  cutting  (here  the  voice  drops  to  G  sharp) 
it's  frightful.  This  system  is  all  wrong.  (Back  again  to  A  flat).  I  always  mark 
off  anyway  if  I  think  a  student  has  cut  a  lot  I  almost  cut  this  morning  myself  I  sat 
up  till  three  o'clock  last  night  talking  to  Miss  Schenck  and  I  thought  I  couldn't 
bear  class  to-day  I  made  up  about  sixteen  good  reasons  for  staying  in  bed  but  then 
(voice  drops  to  G  sharp  again)  I  had  a  conscience.  (Here  back  to  A  flat)  Anyway 
I've  got  so  much  to  do  I  don't  see  how  I  can  ever  get  it  all  in  I've  got  to  make  a 
speech  in  Chicago  on  Friday  and  it's  miles  too  long  and  I  don't  know  where  to  cut  it. 
Oh  it's  a  terrible  job  and  then  all  of  these  envelopes  have  to  be  addressed  and  mailed 
this  afternoon  they've  gone  and  made  me  secretary  of  that  fool  Archaeological 
Society  and  so  I've  got  to  send  out  these  darn  invitations.  Oh  it's  an  awful  job  I've 
just  come  back  from  town  and  I'm  dead  tired.  I  had  gotten  a  blue  cape  that  was 
just  what  I  wanted  for  the  summer  I  thought  it  was  just  right  but  when  I  showed 
it  to  Miss  Schenck  she  said  it  was  too  loud  not  that  I  think  her  taste  is  impeccable 
she  wears  a  black  hat  that  I've  told  her  makes  her  look  like  a  prosperous  Jewess  but 
anyway  I  took  back  the  cape  and  changed  it  for  another  that  I  didn't  like  at  all.  I 
stopped  in  at  the  dentist's  while  I  was  there  he  doesn't  know  how  to  do  anything  but 
charge,  that  man,  last  week  he  put  some  novocaine  in  that  didn't  do  any  good.  I 
nearly  went  crazy  in  the  night  and  the  next  day  I  couldn't  talk  at  all  and  that  same 
day  when  I  was  walking  down  to  Low  Buildings  I  had  to  trip  over  the  fool  curbstone 
and  sprain  this  damn  ankle  again.  Oh  and  then  they  did  what  they  always  do  to 
me — poured  whiskey  down  my  throat  and  if  there's  one  thing  I  can't  stand  it's 
whiskey  well,  come  again  Miss  Stewlett,  I'm  so  rushed  I  don't  see  when  I'll  ever 
have  time  to  do  anything  on  my  Anthology  come  down  to  tea  some  time,  Miss 
Stewlett,  I'm  at  home  every  Sunday 

(With  heavy  sigh,  depressed  student  departs.) 


28 


We  Nominate  for  the  Hall  of  Fame-- 


The  Campus  Mailman 


Phe  Fruit-stand  Max 


The  Postman 


The  Night  Watchman 


How  Travel  Does  Broaden  One ! 

Hotel  Bruffani, 

Perugia. 
My  Humourous  Maisie: 

How  I  do  wish  you  were  here !  We've  had  the  duckiest  time  since  we  landed 
at  Cherbourg  just  a  week  ago.  We've  done  Paris,  the  Cathedrals,  Provence,  the 
Riviera,  Genoa,  Milan,  Venice,  Florence,  Rome,  and  here  we  are  in  Perugia! 
Mother  got  the  darlingest  hat  and  we  had  the  best  time  at  Paris!  Guess  who  we 
met  in  the  Louvre, — why,  Carrie  Remak!  We  both  just  love  Art!  We  stood  in 
front  of  the  Mona  Liza  for  about  half  an  hour.  Carrie  says  she  has  heard  from  Dot 
that  Hockey  Camp  is  pretty  good  this  summer.  She  says  there's  a  wonderful  crowd 
and  that  one  of  the  English  coaches  is  a  perfect  peach !  Have  you  heard  that  Libby 
Austin  and  Aggie  Clement  are  both  getting  married  in  the  fall?  Isn't  that  too 
thrilling!  We  can  all  go  to  the  wedding.  Carrie  says  she  knows  the  best  shop  in 
the  Roo  Saint  Honory.  She  says  Margaret  got  seven  dresses  and  a  hat  and  a  cape, 
and  her  mother  got  a  suit  and  two  evening  dresses,  and  she  picked  up  a  darling 
blue  and  black  ensemble  suit  with  a  hat  to  match — all  for  a  few  hundred  francs. 
Paris  is  just  the  swellest  place  for  shopping — heaps  better  than  Milan;  but  Milan 
Cathedral  is  just  grand!  Whom  do  you  think  we  met  walking  around  the  nave? 
Why,  Crit  and  Leila!  They  said  they'd  come  over  on  the  boat  with  Rhys  Carpen- 
ter and  Rowley.  I  wish  you  could  hear  some  of  the  stories  Mrs.  Newbold  told; 
my  dear,  they'd  make  your  hair  stand  on  end!  Who  would  have  thought  it  of 
Rowley!  Crit  said  Rhys  skipped  rope  on  the  deck  every  morning.  Isn't  he  just 
darling!  I'm  going  to  take  one  of  his  courses  next  year  if  I  can  fit  it  in.  Crit  and 
Leila  didn't  like  the  Cathedral.  They  said  George  Rowley  said  it  wasn't  too  good. 
They  knew  an  awful  lot  about  Art.  We  sat  up  in  the  Kings'  Gallery  and  talked 
and  they  said  Nan  might  be  good  for  Self-Gov.  Well,  of  course,  that  was  a  new 
one  on  me.  Then  we  fought  hot  and  heavy  over  C.  A.  and  Athletic  Pres.  I  tell 
you  I  can  hardly  wait  to  get  back  to  good  old  B.  M. !  But  this  is  God's  own  coun- 
try. Why,  in  Florence  yesterday  I  picked  up  the  darlingest  little  tea-set, — just  the 
thing  for  our  room !  The  pictures  there  are  awfully  pretty,  and  I  didn't  miss  one. 
I  did  the  Uffitzi  in  an  hour  and  a  half,  and  I  could  have  done  it  in  an  hour  if  I'd 
had  my  spiked  shoes.  Venice  was  just  lovely.  We  stayed  there  a  whole  day  and 
we  didn't  mind  the  mosquitoes  half  as  much  as  we  thought  we  would.  It  was  the 
tourists!  Guess  whom  I  met  as  I  was  stepping  into  a  gondola, — I  was  so  surprised  I 
nearly  fell  into  the  Grand  Canal !  It  was  Chizzy,  and  we  had  the  nicest  talk.  She 
had  the  strangest  ideas  about  our  Zizzy — I  wish  you  could  hear  her ! 

I  must  stop  now.  Guess  who's  sitting  beside  me  at  the  next  table  as  I  write 
this?  President  Park.  Well,  it's  a  small  world  after  all!  This  is  almost  as  good 
as  being  home. 

Love  to  you  and  Sue,  and  tell  Betty  I  think  she's  a  big  cheese  not  to  write. 

Yours  till  the  flannel  pants, 

Peg. 

P.S.  I  got  the  darlingest  sauce  pans  in  Paris!  They  certainly  will  brighten 
up  the  tea-pantry. 

30 


The  Ttlermaid  of  Soultmmpion 


five  minuies  before  a  WkierPolo 
yume  ai  Brijti  Ttfavrr 


From  My  College  Window 


or 


The  Masked  Man 


A  LL  was  silent  in  the  hall.  I  was  asleep.  Suddenly  I  was  aroused  by  the  hissing 
*■  *  of  my  faithful  thermostat.  From  long  practice  in  the  lecture  room  I  was  ac- 
customed to  fall  asleep  and  awake  quietly,  so  I  lay  like  one  dead — waiting — waiting 
— and  not  in  vain.  I  became  aware  of  a  presence  sitting  on  the  window-sill.  It 
had  a  mask  on  its  face.  I  was  not  deceived.  It  was — it  was  a  burglar!  Reader, 
imagine  my  dilemma!  Here  was  I  about  to  be  murdered — nay,  robbed  in  my  bed, 
and  I  could  not  call  out,  for  it  was  quiet  hours.  What  should  I  do?  I  lay  like  a  cat 
stealthily  watching  my  foe  as  he  rummaged  among  the  papers  on  my  desk. 

My  report!  He  had  it!  I  barely  stifled  my  shriek  and  lay  trembling.  Why 
had  not  the  maid  hidden  it  as  usual  in  the  scrap  basket?  The  villain  turned  and 
slowly  looked  around  the  room,  till  I  felt  within  me  the  terrible  gnawing  of  the 
horror  vacui.  He  spotted  a  box  of  candy.  (At  that  a  ray  of  hope  gleamed  upon 
my  tortured  soul).  He  reached  out  a  clawlike  hand,  fumbled  a  minute  in  the  box, 
and  bit  a  piece.  Quick  as  a  flash  he  turned  to  the  window  and  leaned  far  out. 
Then  I  knew  that  my  hope  had  been  realized.  He  had  taken  a  licoriced  fig.  My 
moment  had  come.  Instantly  I  was  behind  him,  urging  him  with  a  slight  push  out 
of  the  window,  and  a  moment  later  I  heard  the  thump  below.  I  heaved  a  sigh,  for 
I  knew  I  had  come  out  of  it  safely. 

But,  then,  O  Reader,  settle  my  destroying  doubts !  Have  I  broken  Self-Gov- 
ment  ?     Was  that  a  social  engagemen  t  ? 


I  have  vainly  searched  volumes  of  lore 
To  find  out  the  reason  wherefore 

At  all  kinds  of  meetings 

The  popular  seating's 
Direct! v  in  front  of  the  door! 


32 


Here,  Reader,  you  can  plainly  spy 
The  Classmates  of  our  maters, 

Their  outlooks   obviously   influenced    by 
Their  Tennysons,  Wildes,  and  Paters. 


And  here  you  see  our  modem  crew, 
(Oh,  note  it  with  abhorrence!) 

For  they  their  education  drew 

From  Freud  and  D.  H.  Lawrence. 


Our  Game  Book 


I  AHERE  is  nothing  like  a  good  game  or  two  at  College  to  develop  some  valuable 
-*-  habit  of  mind  in  the  Undergraduate,  and  to  bring  back  the  sparkle  to  eyes 
wearied  with  bridge  playing.  The  student  in  most  cases  will  not  be  conscious  of 
playing  the  games  suggested  in  the  following  lines.  This  element  of  uncertainty, 
however,  is  just  the  thing  which  gives  a  charm  to  the  sport — as  the  element  of  un- 
certainty in  rendering  the  second  verse  of  the  "Star  Spangled  Banner",  or  the 
Curtain  Song  to  Freshman  Show  renders  these  performances  so  absorbing  to  the 
singer. 

1.  "Hunt   the   Slipper". 

This  is  a  very  nice  little  game.  It  needs  only  two  players,  the  student  and  her 
maid.  The  sport  may  be  hard  at  first,  but  there  is  nothing  like  a  good  obstacle  for 
developing  qualities  for  success  in  life. 

In  the  morning  the  maid  hides  the  pajamas,  negligee,  and  slippers  of  the  other 
player,  who,  in  the  evening,  tries  to  find  them  in  ten  minutes.  If  she  succeeds,  she 
gets  a  point.  (But  she  will  not  succeed.)  For  every  five  minutes  over  the  first 
ten,  the  maid  scores  one  point. 

We  would  suggest  as  good  places  to  hide  these  articles,  spots  like  the  fire-place, 
the  tea-pot,  or  the  water-cooler.  Once  into  the  swing  of  the  game,  however,  we  are 
sure  that  the  maid  will  think  of  many  places  less  accessible. 

2.  "Keep  the  Quizzes". 

This  is  played  by  a  professor  and  any  number  of  students.  This  makes  it 
even  nicer  than  the  first,  as  it  leads  to  the  development  of  that  team  spirit  which  is 
so  useful  in  later  life  for  such  occasions  as  Class  Reunions,  Community  Sings,  and 
Women's  Auxiliaries. 

The  game  is  begun  by  the  professor,  who,  in  the  argot  of  the  sport,  "drops  a 
quiz."  If  he  can  do  this  when  the  majority  of  the  class  is  busy  with  a  play,  or 
has  a  long  report  due,  he  begins  with  a  head-start  of  one  point.  The  game  then 
consists  in  the  professor's  seeing  how  long  he  can  keep  the  results  of  the  quiz  from 
the  class.  He  may  resort  to  any  means  he  chooses  to  do  this,  although  it  is  consid- 
ered rather  unsportsmanlike  for  him  to  leave  for  Europe.     If  the  class  succeeds  in 


34 


obtaining  their  marks  within  a  month,  it  scores  a  point,  while  its  antagonist  gets 
one  for  every  three  weeks  he  can  keep  them  over  that  time. 

Such  a  high  record  has  been  attained  by  Miss  King  in  this  game,  however,  that 
there  is  little  chance  for  a  professor  like  Dr.  Gray  to  make  his  mark,  energetic  and 
active  though  he  be. 

3.     "Gym-gypping". 

In  this  game  each  side  is  sure  of  a  foeman  worthy  of  her  steal.  Here  is  found 
the  zest  which  comes  from  playing  for  money. 

The  opposing  sides  are  (1)  the  student  and  (2)  the  gym  dwellers.  The  score  is 
kept  on  a  paper  in  the  gym.  An  amateur  player  will  sign  up  BB  for  Basketball, 
FD  for  Folk  Dancing,  SW  for  Swimming,  etc.  As  the  student  becomes  more 
expert,  however,  she  signs  up  BB  for  Bad  Bicycling,  SW  for  Swearing,  FD  for  Fast 
Driving,  etc.  Some  players  attain  such  proficiency  that  they  sign  up  these  symbols 
without  their  meaning  anything  at  all. 

We  may  add  here  that  if  one  has  become  proficient  in  the  game  of  gym-gypping, 
it  is  not  necessary  to  write  of  this  fact  to  Miss  Taylor  in  a  note  somewhat  on  this 
order. 

"Ah  there,  little  one,  you  lost  two  dollars  by  not  catching  me  last  week!  Come, 
come,  Miss  Taylor,  this  will  never  do!" 

Besides  being  unappreciated  by  the  recipient,  performances  like  this  are  apt 
to  prove  rather  expensive  to  the  player. 


OVERHEARD  IN  THE  SHOW-CASE 

Suitor — What,  they  don't  let  you  motor  at  night  unchaperoned  I 

Suited — Well,  they  do,  if  you're  engaged. 

Suitor — I  call  that  putting  the  cart  before  the  horse! 


35 


T 


remendous 


TriB 


es 


The  battered  laundry  case.  Covered  with 
hundreds  of  cancelled  stamps,  and  fervent 
prayers  for  a  speedy  return. 


r-S'SS  ~fyM±_Xff<*  ^^"^  ^ 

w»  yv'751*';  im.* 

k#  •  *  «  J 

3s^.t,  ....... 

»      '    /. 

''_,-.'    ....,„.. 

■    I.      I     4      i 

Ji  "   1  <  .  .  -...,,."- 

1 

.1    >*  jti   *  -    ,    j,  ir    a   f-     «  « 

.  „  ,. 

*  „   f.  f  »....«.•,„,  ,. 

1          ,    ■'  . 

The  50  irip  ticket — not  transferable. 
Notwithstanding  this  uncomfortable  fact, 
the  writer  within  the  last  three  days  has  been 
respectively  Hilda,  Cornish,  Leila  Barber, 
and  Sarah  Collingham. 


The  notebook  {containing  all  notes  for  the, 
semester)  tohich  inevitably  disappears  just 
before  exams,  and  which  is  advertised  for  by 
hysterical  notes  in  the  Lib. 


The  floral  tribute  from  Jeannette's,  daintily 
done  up  in  the  trusty  grey  box  with  the  green 
cord.  More  excitement  receiving  one  half 
dozen  daffodils  and  a  great  deal  of  tissue- 
paper  from  one's  C.  A.  girl! 


The  mouse  trap  which  has  most  customers 
right  after  that  cake  from  home.  {Most 
times,  however,  the  mouse  gels  the  cake,  the 
cheese,  and  takes  the  trap  home  for  the  kid- 
dies). 


The  Maxfield  Parrishes  —The  pictures 
that  make  the  whole  College  kin.  ''The 
Dickey  Bird"  is  the  prime  favorite  to  date, 
with  "Bloiving  Bubbles"  running  a  close 
second. 


\/- 


The  squirrel — the  only  animal  among  the 
campus  fauna  that  doesn't  want  to  come  in 
the  college  rooms. 


The  good  chocolaU   sunn'  with  which  we 
garnish  our  ice-cream,  tablecloths,  and  dress 

fronts. 


The  change  which  nobody  possesses  when 
our  wants  to  phone.  The  lust  way  to  gel  it 
isio  offer  two  dimes  for  three  nickels. 


I 


I 


^ <  v* 


The  community  lowelfor  use  in  lin-drills. 
Wet  it  and  pass  il  back  to  the  next  one.  after 
the  lieutenant  has  felt  it — suffocate  or  not, 
there's  no  need  to  have  everybody  s  towel 
ruined  in  the  ooze  of  the  fire-pails! 


37 


Since  We  Are  Very  Young — 

i 

What  is  the  matter  with  Mary  Jane  ? 

She's  frowning  with  all  her  might  and  main 

And  won't  eat  her  luncheon,  canned  peaches  again — 

What  is  the  matter  with  Mary  Jane  ? 

What  is  the  matter  with  Mary  Jane  ? 

The  Infirmary  says  she  hasn't  a  pain 

And  there's  canned  babies'  eyeballs  for  dinner  again- 

What  is  the  matter  with  Mary  Jane  ? 

2 
Sam,  Sam, 
Samuel,  Samuel, 
Samuel  Claggett  Chew 
Took  great 
Care  of  his  kittens 
When  they  could  scarcely  mew. 
Sam,  Sam, 
Said  to  his  kittens, 
"Kittens",  he  said,  said  he, 
"I'm  a  tall,  stout  man  and  a  trifle  bald 
"With  bone-rimmed  specs  to  see." 

Sam,  Sam, 

Samuel's  kittens 

Opened  their  sky-blue  eyes. 

Sam,  Sam, 

Samuel's  kittens 

Looked  at  him  with  surprise. 

Said  Gentle  Slum 

To  the  Stuyvesant  cat, 

"Stuyvy,"  he  said,  said  he, 

"If  he  weren't  so  bald  and  so  'trifle  fat' 

"He's  the  man  I  would  Chewse  to  be." 


3S 


© 


<§ 


<s 


0E 


3Q 


When  I  was  a  Freshman,  I  was  captain  of  a  hockey  team. 

Maybe  others  remember  that  team. 

It  was  the  fifth. 

Our  first  match  game  was  on  a  wet  day — 

Maybe  others  remember  that  day — 

The  Apple  blew  the  whistle,  and  both  the  centre  forwards 

Sat  down  together  in  the  same  large  puddle. 


0 


?u.-n 


When  I  was  a  Sophomore,  I  was  captain  of  a  gym  team 

That  was  a  very  nice  team  indeed — 

The  fourth,  I  think. 

In  the  meet  I  spoiled  it  all  by  standing  on  my  head 

On  the  bars,  for  a  very  long  time. 

I  was  showing  off,  but  they  thought  I  was  stuck  there. 

And  a  murmur  arose  which  injured  the  effect. 


Q 


I 


<3 


I  came  back  from  Hockey  Camp  no  longer  an  amateur. 
I  was  captain  of  the  second  hockey  team. 
Wasn't  that  splendid? 

I  went  again  the  next  year  and  came  back  demoted — 
But  is  there  sympathy  for  premature  blossoms 
That  flutter  down,  down  to  the  social  hockey  field? 
No!  Instead  of  "Dean  deah",  I  now  am  "Fines  redoubled!" 

Beth  Dean 


§ 


1$   I 


zzJTnz 


rgi 


^© 


I 


Athletics,  1922-1923 


All-Round  Championship  Won  by  1 923 


Captain — E.  Smith 

A.  Waterbury 
M.  Brown 
H.  Smith 

V.  Lomas 


HOCKEY 
Won  by  1924 

Team 
C.  Cummings 
E.  Lomas 
E.  Glessner 


Manager — K.  Fowler 

L.    VOORHEES 

K.  Fowler 
C.  Remak 
M.  Gardiner 


Substitutes  on  Varsity — L.  Voorhees  and  M.  Gardiner 


Captain — E.  Baldwin 

L.  Voorhees 
E.  Lomas 


WATER  POLO 
Won  by  1923 

Team 
K.  Fowler 

D.  Lee 

E.  Baldwin 


Manager — K.  Fowler 


S.  Carey 
C.  Remak 


40 


K.  Fowler 

E.    LOMAK 

M.  Blumknktock 
C.   CUMMINQS 


SWIMMING  Ml- in- 
Won  by  L926 
Captain — K.  Fowleh 

Team 
M.  Constant 
E.  Baldwin 
II.   I).   Potts 


A.  Waterbur'y 
M.  II.  Pierce 

L.    BARBER 

M.  M.  Dunn 
Tied  for  Third  Place  Individual — E.   Lomas 
College  Record  Broken  For  Plunge— -LEILA  BARBER 


TRACK  MEET 
Won  by  1925 


Captain— -M.  CONSTANT 


Manager— -E.  BRADLEY 


Team 

E.  EVANS 
S.  ANDERSON 
K.  STEINMETZ 
L.  VOORHEES 
First  Place  in  Individual— K.  STEINMETZ 
College  Records  Broken  in  Running  Broad  Jump  and  Hundred  Yard  Dash 

K.  STEINMETZ 


E.  GLESSNER 

D.  LEE 
C.  REMAK 

E.  BRADLEY 


M.  CONSTANT 
M.  M.  DUNN 
V.  LOMAS 
H.  CORNISH 


Captain — M.  Brown 

M.  Brown 

A.  Waterbury 

K.    STEINMETZ 


APPARATUS  MEET 
Won  by  1924 

Team 
D.  Lee 
M.  Mutch 
K.  Fowler 


Manager — M.  Mutch 

L.  Voorhees 
M.  Shumway 
S.  Anderson 


C.  Remak 
M.  Brown 


TENNIS 

Won  by  1923 

Captain — E.  Boross 

Team 

E.  Boross 

On  Varsity — C  Remak 


M.  Bonnell 
H.  Herrman 


Captain— C.  REMAK 


S.  ANDERSON 
C.  REMAK 


BASKETBALL 
Won  by  1925 

Team 

L.  VOORHEES 


Manager— E.  SMITH 

M.  MUTCH 
D.  LEE 


On  Varsity— C.  REMAK  and  L.  VOORHEES 
41 


Junior  Year 


1  m\ 


<u<^ 


y 


i\  .  v 


M#S§^ 


OQQD  01) 


' 


' 


"SSBB 


fcj 


Class  Officers 


1923-1924 
President         ...  .  .         Susan  S   Carey  (reign 

\  [RGINIA    VV.    LOW 

,-•  ,  n •/,,,,  ,,,j  -/•,, ,..,,„„.  Virginia  W.  Lomas  (resigned) 

1  we- i  resident  and  treasurer       ...  _  ,/, 

Dorothy  B.  Lee 

Secretary  ......  .     Elizabeth  B.  Lawrence 

S  ELF-G  OV  ERN  M  E  N  T  A  SSOCI ATION 
Secretary  .......  Elizabeth  C.   Dean 

Executive  Board 
Helen  A.  Hough  Eleanor  V.  St.  John 

UNDERGRADUATE  ASSOCIATION 
Vice-President  .......  Elizabeth  L.  Smith 

Secretary  .........       Leila  C.  Barber 

Advisory  Board         ....  .  .  Rachel  A.  Poster 

CHRISTIAN  ASSOCIATION 
Treasurer         ........     Elizabeth  L.  Lawrence 

Advisory  Board 
Susan  S.  Carey  Margaret  Stewardson  (resigned) 

Elizabeth  G.  Mallett  Elizabeth  C.  Dean 

ATHLETIC  ASSOCIATION 

Executive  Board 

Caroline  V.  Remak  Katherine  S.  Fowler 

Miriam  G.  Brown 

THE  LANTERN 

Editorial  Board 

Edith  H.  Walton  Elizabeth  C.  Dean 

Business  Board 
Laura  B.  D.  Garrison  Margaret  E.  Gardiner 

THE  COLLEGE  NEWS 

Editors 

Carol  Cummings  Helen  S.  Grayson 

Business  Board 
Margaret  Boyden  Marion  W.  Nagle 

SONG  MISTRESS 
May  Morrill  Dunn 
Assistant  Song  Mistress     .......    Clara  L.  Gehring 

45 


Bryn  Mawr  Theatre 

THIS   WEEK'S  ATTRACTIONS 


BARRIE'S  CHOICE 

James  H.  Leuba 

Billy  Smith 

IN 

IN 

"Dante's  Inferno" 

"Peter  Pan" 

(By  Dante) 

WITH 

What  the  critics  say: 

Mrs.  Smith  as  Wendy 

"/  think  this  is  all  wrong,  and  you're  mean 

See  Peter  teach  Wendy  to  fly 

to  put  it  in!" 

RritjgiJ 

"OUR  OWN  ELLY" 

The  Comedy  that  took  four  years 

Eleanor  Bontecou 

to  be  appreciated 

IN 

Samuel  Arthur  King 

"Broken   Blossoms" 

IN 

OR 

"A Voice  from  the  Passed" 

Through  the  Keyhole 

featuring  the 

The  most  pathetic  story  ever  told 

Perfect  36 

THE    DELAGUNAS 

in 

'Orphans  of  the  Storm' 

Special  Organ  Accompaniment — "Seeing  Delly  Home" 


COMING  NEXT  WEEK 
CARL  TON  BROWN  in  "The  Wanderer  of  the  Waist  Band" 


In  Autumn 


In  Autumn  when  the  hockey  sticks 
She  took  the  last  of  her  matrics. 

In  Winter  when  the  swimming  meets 
She  faced  the  chapel's  empty  seats. 

In  Spring  when  all  the  tennis  racket 
She  took  her  trunk  as  if  to  pack  it. 

I  sent  a  question  to  the  Dean. 

I  asked  her,  "Tell  me  what  you  mean: 

The  Dean  of  Women  answered  me, 
"You  see  too  much  of  X.  Y.  Z." 

I  sent  to  her  again  to  say, 
"I  shall  petition  that  I  may." 

She  answered  with  a  meaning  eye, 
"If  granted,  let  us  see  you  try!" 

She  told  me  once,  she  told  me  twice, 
She  gave  me  lots  of  good  advice. 

She  gave  me  such  a  beaming  grin, 
And  what  a  temper  I  was  in ! 

She  took  a  kettle  large  and  new, 
And  said,  "Here's  tea  from  M  to  Q." 

But  someone  came  to  her  and  said, 
"Your  canine,  Shandy  B.,  has  fled." 

She  said,  "I  cannot  give  my  tea 
Unless  you  bring  him  back  to  me." 

She  spoke  it  loud  and  in  his  ear. 

He  said,  "You  needn't  come  so  near." 

She  spoke  it  low,  with  faltering  ring. 
He  answered,  "Go  to  Mr  King." 


47 


THE   MAY   DAILY 


WEATHER -RAIN 


TIME  OF  NEXT  PUBLICATION- DOUBTFUL 


Model  Sacrifices 


Wealth  To  Love 


Obscure  painter  conquers  mili- 
tary magnate  in  young  girl's 
thoughts. 


In  a  special  interview  to  the 
"May  Daily",  Miss  Campaspe, 
alleged  wife  of  Apelles,  is  quoted 
as  saying,  "After  all,  love  is 
enough.  I  thought  I  could  live 
with  Alexander  until  he  tried  to 
paint  my  portrait.  This  made 
me  realize  that  I  had  never  loved 
him.  Then  Apelles  kissed  me, 
and  my  soul  awoke." 


Sir  Oliver  Lodge  Condemns 

"Old  Wives'  Tale" 


Sir  Oliver  Lodge  confided  to 
the  May  Daily  his  belief  that 
"Old  Wives'  Tale"  is  psychically 
untrue.  "I  believe  it  impossi- 
ble," he  said,  "for  spirits  so  long 
poured  out  of  this  earthly  bottle, 
to  have  the  strength  to  kill  any- 
one. There  is  only  one  possible 
solution,  i.e.  that  Sacrapant  was 
already  half  seas  over." 


"It  Will  Be  a  Success," 

Says  Mr.  King 

Producer  gives  optimistic  opinion 


Mr.  S.  A.  King,  director  and 
producer,  leapt  out  of  bed  this 
morning  exclaiming,  "It  will  be 
a  success!"  The  words  were 
echoed  around  the  campus  by 
hundreds  of  glad  voices,  for  the 
oracle  had  spoken;  th're  could 
be  no  further  doubt.  It  is  well 
known  that  without  the  inval- 
uable assistance  of  Mr.  Samuel 
Arthur  King,  May  Day  could 
never  have  been  achieved. 

Adv. 


Divorce  Hinted  At  As  Result 

of  Midsummer  Night 


It  is  whispered  through  Fairy- 
land that  a  disagreement  has 
arisen  between  a  couple  in  ex- 
alted circles.  Mrs.  X.  refused 
to  be  interviewed  concerning  the 
man  in  the  case,  but  her  small 
representative  remarked  in  a 
ringing  voice,  "My  mistress  is 
charmed  by  him." 

Mr.  X.,  when  questioned 
about  the  co-respondent,  is  re- 
ported to  have  said,  "He  is  a 
perfect  ass." 


St.  George  and  the  Dragon 
Given  With  Helpful  Co-operation 


Influence  of  Russian  Players  felt 

The  old  English  play  of  St. 
George  was  rendered  with  unique 
spirit.  The  players  forgot  them- 
selves and  consequently  the 
audience  will  never  forget  them. 
St.  George's  lines  were  beauti- 
fully pronounced  by  King  Alfred, 
and  his  in  turn  by  the  noble 
Doctor,  while  the  cursed  Dragon 
in  spite  of  his  sore  throat  roared 
a  hearty  accompaniment. 


Question  of  Jail  in  Students' 

Building  Mooted 


The  recent  prevalence  of 
undesirable  vagrants,  such  as 
dancing  bears,  jugglers,  strolling 
singers,  worms,  etc.,  has  raised 
the  question  of  whether  or  not 
to  put  a  jail  in  the  new  Student's 
Building.  An  eminent  authori- 
ty is  said  to  find  in  the  presence 
of  so  many  traffic  disturbances 
an  argument  for  his  immigration 
bill. 


W.  C.  T.  U.  Files  Protests 

Against  Bacchantes 

Sealed  hearing  to  take  place 

"You  are  corrupting  the  mind 
of  innocent  American  youth!" 
they  cry.  "You  are  sowing 
seeds  the  roots  of  which  will 
make  St.  Volstead  turn  in  his 
grave."  They  are  also  reported 
to  have  seen  in  the  union  of 
Indians  and  Bacchantes  the 
future  abolition  of  all  intoxicat- 
ing tobaccos.  A  sealed  hearing 
is  to  take  place  at  some  ful  lire 
date  somewhere. 


"Marion,  You'll  Soon 

Be  Marryin'  Me" 

Idyllic  union  predicted 

When  ye  stalwart  knight 
Robin  Hood  wooed  ye  mayde 
Marian  ye  skies  smiled  and  ye 
trees  whispered  behind  their 
leaves.  Ye  noble  King  Fichard 
blessed  ye  fair  mayde  and 
ye  MAY  DAILY  predicts  an 
union  soone. 

Only  one  criticism  heard 

The  only  criticism  expressed 
on  this  occasion  was  that  of  Max 
Reinhart  who  is  said  to  have 
muttered,  "Too  much  horse- 
play."    Jealous,   no  doubt. 

WANTED 

1000  old  scissors,  knives,  broom- 
handles,  etc.  Apply  to  any 
stage  manager. 

SAFETY  PINS  by  owners  of 
costumes. 

COMPETENT  INDIVIDUAL, 
Protestant,  refined,  not  over 
thirty-five,  to  make  two  hun- 
dred and  eighty  paper  flowers 
for  prominent  actress. 

MORE  CUTS  by  Casting  Com- 
mittee, Inc. 

NINE  SETS  of  RED  FLAN- 
NEL UNDERWEAR  by 
Flowers. 

ONE  DOZEN  BEARDS,  pre- 
ferably tawny,  to  make  Faculty 
look  "just  like  men." 


(        » 


Conic     OECTIOM 

of  the 


7A 


AX 


Da 


w 


iLy 


f 


fe 
i*^ 


R 


rrrm 
•  »  •  • 


.»  •  •  • 

«  ■  »  >  » 


«  »  » 

•  •  • 

•  »  • 

•  • « 

•  •  • 

•  <  • 


Sta6e  Setting  Tor  Alexander  ar^ 

Cam|3a5f)e'  in  tT)enon  Sittind  Koon) 
IMacK  dote  represent  aiuVnce. 


The  G'\r>cgrbrea6  Hen  — 


v    l 


-^^ 


The   Lunch  Table  That  T)ay 


The     Faculty 5    Tart 


not  Cubism-  Last   House 


The  Taper  Flowers 


A.ME 


Rotogravure  Section 


Athletics,  1923-1924 

All-Round  Championship  Won  by  1 924 


Captain — E.  Glessnee 

E.  Bradley 
S.  Carey 

D.  Lee 

E.  Smith 


HOCKEY 
Won  by  1924 

Team 
K.  Fowler 
V.  Lomas 
E.  Lomas 


Manager — E.  Lomas 

C.  Remak 
E.  Glessner 
L.  Voorhees 
M.  Gardiner 


On  Varsity — D.  Lee 
Substitute  on  Varsity — E.  Glessner 

WATER  POLO 
Won  by  1924 


Captain — E.  Baldwin 


Manager — K.  Fowler 


Team 
L.  Voorhees  C.  Remak  S.  Carey 

K.  Fowler  E.  Lomas  E.  Baldwin 

D.  Lee 
On  Varsity — D.  Lee  and  L.  Voorhees 


K.  Fowler 
E.  Lomas 
D.  Lee 


D.  Lee 
M.  Brown 

E.  Lomas 


SWIMMING  MEET 

Won  by  1926 
Captain — K.  Fowler 

Team 
E.  Baldwin 
M.  Blumenstock 

APPARATUS  MEET 

Won  by  1924 
Captain — M.  Brown 

Team 

C.  Cummings 
M.  Shumway 
S.  Anderson 


M.  M.  Dunn 
L.  Barber 
H.  D.  Potts 


K.  Fowler 
E.  St.  John 
E.  Bradley 


54 


Captain — E.  Boross 

C.  Remak 
E.  Bokoss 


TENNIS 
Won  by  1926 

Ten  in 
S.  Andkrson 


Manager—  C.  R  km  a  k 

\1.    BONNELL 

II.   [-Ierrman 


On  Varsity    C.  Remak 
Individual  Championship — C.  REMAK 

BASKETBALL 
Won  by  1925 


Captain— C.   REMAK 

S.  CAREY 
C.  REMAK 


Team 
L.  VOORHEES 

On  Varsity—  C.  REMAK 


Manager—  S.  CAREY 

M.  CASTLEMAN 
K.  FOWLER 


Senior  Y 


Class  Officers 

1924-1925 


President 

Vice-President  and  Treasurer 

Secretary 


Caroline  V.  Remak 

Elizabeth  L.  Smith 

Miriam  G,  Brown 


SELF-GOVERNMENT  ASSOCIATION 
President                            .                            ....      Helen  A.  Hough 
Vice-President Eleanor  V.  St.  John 

UNDERGRADUATE  ASSOCIATION 


President 
Vice-President 


Leila  C.  Barber 
Virginia  W.  Lomas 


CHRISTIAN  ASSOCIATION 
President  .         .  ....     Margaret  Stewardson 

Vice-President Susan  S.  Carey 

Advisory  Board 
Adele  A.  Pantzer  Elizabeth  C.  Dean 


President 


ATHLETIC  ASSOCIATION 


58 


Dorothy  B.  Lee 


Editor-4n-(  'hief 

Elizabeth  C.  Dean 

Manager 
Advertising  Manager 


Manager 


Assistant  Song  Mistress 


President 
Business  Manager 
Stage  Manager 


President 


President 


President 


THE  LANTERN 

Editors 
Business  Hoard 


THE  COLLEGE  NEWS 
Business  Board 

Marion  W.  Nagle 

SONG  MISTRESS 
May  Morrill  Dunn 


GLEE  CLUB 


Edith  II.  Walton 

Barbara  Ling 

Margaret  E.  Gardiner 
Laura  B.  I).  Garrison 

.    Margaret  Boyden 


LIBERAL  CLUB 


FRENCH  CLUB 


SCIENCE  CLUB 


Clara  L.  Gehring 


May  Morrill  Dunn 
Helen  Henshaw 
Maris  Constant 


Helen  S.  Chisolm 


Helen  S.  Grayson 


Eleanor  de  F.  Baldwin  (resigned) 
Katherine  S.  Fowler 


59 


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Women's  Page 


YOUR  BABY  AND  MINE— Conducted  by  G.  G.  K. 
Dear  Editor — I  am  five  feet  three  inches  tall,  have  red  hair  and  twins,  a  boy 
and  a  girl.  They  are  perfect  little  devils,  Editor,  and  as  bright  as  they  come. 
However,  will  you  help  me  choose  names  for  them  ?  They  are  twenty -five  years  of 
age  apiece,  and  I  think  it  is  about  time  that  I  should  think  of  these  things. 
Cordially, 

Mrs.  X.  Y.  Z. 

Dear  Mrs.  X.  Y.  Z. — I  feel  as  though  I  know  you  already !  Dear,  yes !  Children 
are  a  responsibility,  but  they  are  joys,  too, — no  matter  what  Mrs.  Sanger  says. 
And  here  are  some  lovely,  lovely  names  for  the  tots. 

If  your  small  daughter  is  possessed  of  great  beauty,  striking  intelligence,  and 
an  overstuffed  dog,  call  her  "Georgiana."  If  she  has  mastered  the  principles  of 
articulation,  and  has  that  voice  with  a  smile,  call  her  "Lucy."  If  she  reminds  you 
of  a  sylph  among  the  aspens  on  a  windy  day,  let  "Eunice"  be  her  cognomen.  If, 
on  the  other  hand,  she  is  a  little  below  grade  in  human  intelligence  (you  know  how 
these  things  do  happen)  call  her  "Amphyllis,"  or  "Mina  Proctor." 

And  now  for  the  brother  of  little  Georgiana.  (I  really  think  you  ought  to 
christen  her  that.)  If  he  inherits  your  Titian  propensity,  don't  you  think  "Rufus" 
would  be  appropriate?  Then  again  you  may  care  for  "Fonger."  (No,  no,  not  fungus, 
my  dear.)  "Theophile"  is  good,  if  you  like  these  modern  cave-men.  If  your  off- 
shoot is  a  perfect  lamb  (as  I  am  sure  he  is,)  call  him  "Samuel  Claggett." 

NURSERY  HINTS 

Every  tired  mother  who  has  kiddies  of  the  college  age  knows  how  aggravating 
the  tots  can  be  at  times.  This  is  because  the  youngsters  have  nothing  to  do. 
But  now  I  have  solved  the  problem.  No  longer  do  I  have  headaches  or  dizzy  spells. 
I  can  even  do  my  own  housework — all  because  I  have  thought  up  lovely  occupations 
for  the  peevish  undergraduate.     Here  are  two  of  my  favorite  suggestions. 

Turn  the  children  loose  in  the  nursery  with  just  heaps  and  heaps  of  bright- 
colored  tissue  paper,  paste,  and  wire,  and  tell  them  to  make  paper  posies!  The 
results  may  be  quaint,  and  a  little  abortive,  but  the  game  will  tire  out  the  young 
barbarians  sufficiently  to  make  them  tractable.  Then  there  is  always  the  chance 
that  the  little  dears  will  eat  the  paste  or  strangle  each  other  with  the  wire,  thus 
alleviating  all  further  headaches  for  the  mother. 

Here  is  another  pastime  for  Kollege  Kiddies.  Teach  them  to  tat!  My  little 
Edwardina  tatted  the  most  beautiful  antimicassar  for  me  while  she  waited  for 
interviews,  physicals,  and  for  the  Infirmary  to  open.  The  most  popular  tatting 
design  is  made  by  setting  and  turning  single,  side-righting,  and  casting  off. 

DOROTHY  DIX'S  COLUMN  FOR  GIRLS 
Dear  Dorothy  Dix — I  am  a  Freshman,  (as  they  call  it  here),  have  a  frank, 
open  face,  and  am  young,  strong  and  willing  to  work.     I  am  violently  attached  to  a 
Senior,  and  have  taken  her  out  to  supper  (as  they  call  it  here),  every  night  for  the 

62 


last  two  weeks.  Now,  Miss  Dix,  here  is  my  problem.  She  is  very  sweet,  to  me  al 
supper,  but  when  she  meets  me  on  campus,  she  doesn't  speak  to  me.  Will  you  tell 
me  how  to  act  to  make  her  less  indifferent?  I'll  do  anything,  for  I  am  young, 
Strong,  and  willing  to  work. 

Goldilocks. 

Dear  Goldilocks — First,  Goldilocks,  have  yon  confided  your  trouble  to  your 
mother?  Remember,  your  mother  is  your  best  friend  and  will  never  desert  you. 
But  I  shall  try  to  help  you  for  the  present,  dear. 

Continue  taking  your  vSenior  out  to  supper  for  the  next  two  weeks,  but  without 
her  noticing  it,  sign  her  name  instead  of  yours  to  the  check.  When  the  first  of  the 
month  comes  around,  you  will  find  that  her  indifference  is  entirely  cured. 

SOCIETY  AND  FASHION  NOTES 

There  has  been  a  quaint  fad  among  our  ladies  of  Faculty  Row  concerning  hats. 
(Dolly  may  mention  here  that  the  fad  is  not  half  so  quaint  as  the  hats.)  A  most 
stimulating  contest  is  on  among  these  ladies  as  to  who  shall  wear  a  single  hat  the 
longest.  On  dit,  however,  that  the  dowagers  in  question  are  really  laudable  souls, 
who  refuse  to  abandon  possessions  of  long  standing.  In  other  words,  they  believe 
that  a  hat  may  be  down,  but  it's  never  out. 

There  is  only  one  accepted  way  of  wearing  one's  headgear,  according  to  these 
arbiters  of  millinery.  The  hat  must  be  firmly  tilted  aft,  at  an  angle  of  forty-five 
degrees,  so  that  the  entire  brow  and  forelock  are  exposed.  In  this  way  the  ladies 
obtain  the  airy  informality  of  the  hatless  younger  generation,  with  the  restraint 
and  conservatism  of  our  winsome  British  cousin,  Queen  Mary. 

DEBUTS  OF  THE  WEEK 
Dr.  Brown's  examination  marks  are  coming  out  this  time  next  year. 
Dr.  Fenny's  shirt-tails  will  come  out  at  the  next  Facultv  Hockey  Game. 


Alita — Do  you  take  the  Development  of  the  English  Donnelly 
Alowa — No,  I  take  History  and  Appreciation  of  Horace. 


63 


Graduating  With  Honor 


Emily  Pepper  Watts 
Allegra  Woodworth 

Anne  McDowell  Siiiras 


Magna  Cum  Laudc 

Catharine  Kirke  Gatchell 
Gail  Gates 

Christine  Ritchie  Stolzenbach 
Edith  Howard  Walton 


Cum  Laudc 


Katharine  Stevens  Fowler 
Janetta  Wright  Schoonover 
Katharine  Elizabeth  McBride 
Barbara  Hyde  Ling 
Mary  Alice  Cheston 
Helen  Anastasia  Hough 
Clara  Louise  Gehring 
Adele  Amelia  Pantzer 
Miriam  Grubb  Brown 


Frances  Eddy  Bkiggs 
Mary  Lorene  Lytle 
Elsie  Lana  Evans 
Wilhelmine  Dunn 
Ethelyn  Hampton 
Caroline  Stockton   Quarles 
Merle  Whitcomb 
Maris  Sinclair  Constant 
Mary  Louise  White 


European  Fellow 
Emily  Pepper  Watts 

George  W.   Childs  Essay  Prize 
Edith  Howard  Walton 

Sunny  Jim 
Dorothy  Blackburn  Lee 


64 


■ 


V-R--TY  DR-T-CS 


A  S  one  looks  back  on  the  history  of  Varsity  Dramatics,  it  is  interesting  to  note 
■*■  *■  that  the  scheme  has  always  been  a  war  measure.  For  instance,  Varsity 
Dramatics  came  simultaneously  with  America's  entrance  into  the  European  War  in 
1917. 

From  the  moment  that  the  Legislature  meeting  in  the  Chapel  unanimously 
voted  in  its  sleep  to  lay  the  "Romantic  Young  Lady"  to  rest  beside  "The  Liar", 
and  to  give  a  Varsity  Play,  a  strange  new  spirit  brooded  over  the  campus.  It  was 
the  spirit  of  intrigue.  People  who  had  hitherto  led  unsuspecting  and  unsuspected 
lives  suddenly  developed  talents  worthy  of  the  family  retainer  of  the  Borgias. 
Young  fire-brands  arose  from  the  ranks  to  proclaim  the  rights  of  the  downtrodden 
masses,  who,  being  unable  to  act,  would  never  have  the  chance  to  prove  it  again. 
Aesthetes  could  be  heard  in  the  dim  watches  of  the  night  vibrating  their  thanks- 
giving for  deliverance  from  these  same  masses. 

The  Committee  (for  one  had  sprung  into  being)  lived  in  happy  ignorance  of  all 
this,  or,  at  least  it  lived  in  only  partial  enlightenment.  For  that  desirable  state 
was  speedily  reached  in  which  no  one  communicates  with  anyone  else  except  by 
means  of  writing  or  a  third  person. 

The  choosing  of  a  play  was  a  comparatively  simple  matter.  It  was  only 
necessary  to  find  one  which  would  be  a  good  exponent  of  the  new  campus  disease, 
the  Grand  or  Gregorian  Manner.  People  suffering  from  an  acute  attack  of  the 
G.  M.  may  be  seen  approaching  the  Daily  Bath  with  a  tread  worthy  only  of  one 
approaching  the  nuptial  altar.  The  best  exponents  also  have  a  strong  tendency 
never,  no  matter  what  the  provocation,  to  turn  their  backs  on  the  audience. 

The  try-outs  went  on  in  much  the  usual  fashion,  except  that  they  were  being 
run  in  conjunction  with  the  1905  Infirmary,  until  somehow  or  other  the  news  got 
around  that  the  "School  for  Scandal"  contained  a  drinking  scene.  From  that  time 
on,  the  halls  in  Merion  were  crowded  with  people  in  all  possible  stages  of  intoxica- 
tion— all  desiring  to  try  out  for  "drunks."  That  their  enthusiasm  did  not  really 
carry  them  far  enough  was,  however,  apparent  later  on. 

This  was  when  Mr.  King  gave  his  interpretation  of  Sir  Harry  Bumper  "slightly 
under  the  influence".  We  should  have  liked  to  have  seen  his  conception  of  someone 
"greatly  under  the  influence."     The  next  step  would  have  been  delirium  tremens. 

From  this  time  on,  there  was  a  flexibility  about  the  casting  which  was  piquant 
in  the  extreme.  We  can  safely  say  now  that  any  feeling  that  Varsity  Dramatics 
was  autocratic  has  long  since  been  disproved.  Almost  anyone  had  a  part,  and  no 
one  had  it  for  long.  Parts  have  been  passed  as  flaming  torches  from  hand  to  hand 
at  almost  incredible  speed.  A  spirit  of  spontaneity  and  informality  was  certainly 
assured  by  a  little  haziness  on  the  night  of  the  dress  rehearsal  as  to  just  who  was 
playing  what  part. 

The  greatest  success  was  of  course  impossible,  for  the  Committee  was  still  on 
speaking  terms  on  the  night  of  the  performance.  True  efficiency  can  be  reached 
only  when  one  may  say  with  Machiavelli,  "You  have  gained  a  Committee,  but  I 
have  lost  a  friend." 

66 


'SUNNY  JIM' 


Athletics,  1924-1925 


HOCKEY 

Captain — E. 

Won  by  1926 
Glessner 

Team 

Manager — E.  Lomas 

S.  Carey 

V.  Lomas 

C.  Remak 

H.  Smith 

E.  Lomas 

E.  Glessner 

D.  Lee 

K.  Fowler 

E.  Smith 

M.  Brown 

M.  Gardiner 

On  Varsity — D.  Lee,  K.  Fowler, 

M. 

Gardiner 

Substitutes  on  Varsity — E.  Glessner 

E. 

Smith 

WATER  POLO 

Won  by  1926 

Captain — E. 

Lomas 

Team 

Manager — K.  Fowler 

E.  Lomas 

C.  Remak 

S.  Carey 

K.  Fowler 

E.  Glessner 
D.  Lee 

H.  D.  Potts 

6S 


Captain — K.  FOWLER 

L.  Barber 

M.  Blumenstock 


Captain— E.  BRADLEY 

E.  BRADLEY 
M.  BROWN 
D.  LEE 


SWIMMINC.  MEET 
Won  by  1927 

Team 

D.  Lee 

M.  M.  Dunn 

APPARATUS  MEET 
Won  by  1925 

Team 

E.  MALLETT 
E.  St.  JOHN 
K.  FOWLER 


Manager     E.   LoMAS 

E.  Lomas 
K.  Fowler 


Manager— M.  BROWN 

S.  ANDERSON 
M.  SHUMWAY 
H.  SMITH 


First  Place  in  Individual  Won  by  S.  ANDERSON 

TENNIS 
Won  by  1926 


Captain — E.  Boross 

C.  Remak 
E.  Boross 


Captain — D.  Lee 

E.  Smith 
C.  Remak 


Team 
S.  Anderson 

On  Varsity — C.  Remak  (Captain) 

BASKETBALL 

Team 
D.  Lee 

On  Varsity — C.  Remak 
Substitute  on  Varsitv — D.  Lee 


Manager — M.  Browx 

M.  Brown 
H.  Herrmax 


Manager — E.   Smith 

S.  Carey 

M.  Castleman 


09 


-One  Red  Leaf,  the  Last  of  Its  Clan— 


i> 


A     HUSH  spread  over  the  vast  consultation  room,  and  all  the  children  stopped 
■*■  *■  fidgeting. 

The  President  arose. 

"We  arc  gathered  together,"  she  said,  "to  diagnose,  and,  if  possible,  to  suggest 
a  remedy  in  the  case  of  the  lowest  person  in  a  class.  Why  should  there  be  a  lowest 
person?  The  Dean  and  I  have  been  discussing  and  investigating  this  matter,  and 
the  Dean  has  a  report  she  would  like  to  read." 

The  Dean  arose  and  choked. 

"In  every  class  there  has  been  a  lowest  person,"  she  began  in  a  strained  voice. 
"This  alone  is  unusual.  In  1004  there  was  one  from  Philadelphia,  and  in  1012  there 
was  one  with  red  hair" — 

Here  she  caught  sight  of  the  littlest  Faculty  sitting  in  the  back  row  doing  his 
Harmony  lesson.  Startled  at  this  inattention  she  sat  down,  covered  with  con- 
fusion. 

The  President  spoke.  "Suppose  we  take  the  lowest  one  in  this  year's  class,  for 
example." 

One  of  the  Faculty  remarked  threateningly,  "Her  mother  is  a  friend  of  mine." 

"Let's  take  the  next  one,"  said  the  Dean,  brightly. 

"She  has  too  much  charm,"  said  the  Star  Vibrator,  tapering  off  the  "m". 

"Oh,  well,  take  anybody,"  said  the  President. 

"Take  any  one,  take  nine,"  said  the  littlest  Faculty,  rapturously. 

The  Psychologist  in  the  front  row  removed  his  glasses. 

"I  think,"  he  said,  looking  in  Pillsbury's  Essentials  of  Psychology,"  that  there 
is  some  trouble  at  the  synapses  between  the  associatory  neurones." 

The  youngest  Faculty  ventured  a  timid  remark.  "Um  hmmmm.  Maybe  she 
has  no  executive  abiilty,"  he  said  reminiscently. 

The  Philosopher,  rousing  a  seapussy  from  his  lap,  placed  his  hand  at  his 
waistline.  "Maybe  she  has  too  much.  She  has  obtained  the  greatest  result  wTith 
the  least  effort." 

"What  a  fresh  remark!"  said  the  Musician. 

"That's  a  solution,"  said  the  President.  "The  trouble  is  that  the  lowest  person 
is  too  clever.     And  we  can't  cure  that.     Shall  we  adjourn?" 

And  the  audience  kindly  remained  seated  until  the  academic  procession  had 
passed  out  of  the  building. 


71 


Pipe  Down,  Bryn  Mawr ! 

f  Horace,   behind  the  piano 
|  Mr.  Willoughby,  behind  Horace 
Dramatis  Personae  {  Mr.  Surette,  behind  a  statue 

150  students 
24  sheets  of  music 

Scene — Wyndham  Music  Room 

(The  room  is  crowded  with  students,  who  perch  on  the  floor,  the  window  sills, 
and  the  chandeliers.  The  choir,  accustomed  to  sing  in  Chapel,  is  somewhat  self- 
conscious  at  facing  such  a  large  audience,  and  tries  to  retire  behind  the  geraniums 
in  the  windows.     Miss  Ely,  sotto  voce,  "Oh,  my  geraniums!' 

As  the  curtain  rises,  Horace  has  doled  out  the  twenty-four  mimeographed  sheets 
of  music  (Willoughby  fecit)  and  the  150  students  are  rending  a  Creole  song  with 
enthusiasm  and  very  English  accents.) 

150  voices — Po'  li'l  Lolo  she  gwine  die — (Piano  stops). 

Horace — No,  no!  Sing  it  allegro  ma  non  troppo — that  is,  with  more  of  a 
swoop.     (Illustrates.) 

150  voices,  (with  pleased  buzz) — Just  too  sweet! 

(Horace,  not  knowing  whether  this  refers  to  himself  or  po'  li'l  Lolo,  retires  into 
the  piano  and  playing  resumes). 

150  voices,  (allegro  ma  non  troppo,  that  is,  with  a  swoop)  Po'  li'l  Lolo  she 
gwine  die — etc. 

Mr.  Surette  (from  behind  statue) — Bravo! 

Hor. — Now  Miss  X.  Y.  Z.  is  going  to  play  the  Angels'  Serenade  on  the  bassoon, 
accompanied  by  Miss  Gehring  at  the  piano.  (Applause)  (Miss  X.  Y.  Z.  serenades 
vigorously  for  at  least  sixty  measures,  and  then  looks  panic-stricken,  and  stops. 
The  angels  have  deserted  her.) 

Mr.  Surette  (loudly) — Bravo!     (Mrs.  Surette  attends  to  him). 

(After  a  short  silence,  however,  the  basson  has  resinned  playing,  faltering  at 
first,  but  swelling  loud  and  clear,  and  the  angels  redeem  themselves.  Tremendous 
applause  from  audience.) 

Hor. — And  now  the  choir,  led  by  Mr.  Willoughby,  is  going  to  sing  a  Bach 
Chorale. 

(The  choir  emerges  from  the  geraniums  with  many  titters,  and  shifts  bashfully 
from  foot  to  foot.     Mr.  Willoughb}'  places  himself  at  the  head  of  his  forces.) 

Mr.  Surette  (from  behind  statue) — Oh,  Mr.  Willoughby,  why  can't  we  all  join  ' 
in  the  Chorale?     Most  of  us  know  it,  don't  we? 

2  voices  from  audience — Of  course  we  do ! 

Mr.  Surette  (jovially) — Then  we're  ready  when  you  are,   Mr.  Willoughby! 

(Audience  clears  throats.     Horace  turns  face  away  and  looks  strained). 

Mr.  Willoughby  (apprehensively) — All  right — one,  two,  three,  begin! 

(The  choir  sings  in  four  parts.  The  audience,  not  to  be  outdone,  sings  in  six 
or  seven,  not  counting  four  improvised  tenors.  Fifteen  minutes  later  the  Chorale 
comes  to  a  lingering  close,  with  the  audience  two  laps  ahead  of  the  choir.) 


150  voices — Just,  too  wonderful! 

Mr.  Surette — Can't,  we  do  that  over  again  a  little  better,  Mr.  Willoughby? 
(Mr.  Willoughby  looks  dejected.) 

Horace  (hastily) — Do  you  think  there's  time,  Mr.  Surette?  We  have  several 
numbers  on  the  program,  still. 

(Mr.  Surette  yields  the  point,  and  retires  behind  the  statue.  The  choir  looks 
exhausted  and  retires  among  the  geraniums.  Miss  Ely,  sotto  voce,  "Oh,  my 
geraniums!") 

Hor. — Now  Miss  A.  B.  C.  will  sing  a  French  song  for  us.     (Applause). 

(Miss  A.  B.  C.  arises,  smiles,  blushes,  and  sings  the  first  ten  verses  of  a  song 
entitled  "Les  Petits  Pois.") 

Mr.  Surette — Bravo!     Encore! 

(Miss  A.  B.  C.  smiles,  blushes,  and  for  a  time  it  looks  as  though  the  second 
ten  stanzas  of  "Les  Petits  Pois"  are  imminent.  Horace,  however,  arises  hastily, 
and  the  danger  passes.) 

Hor.  (to  audience) — Now  what  would  you  like  to  do? 

150  voices  (crescendo) — You  play  for  us! 

(Horace  looks  hunted,  but  all  egress  is  blocked  by  Mr.  Surette  behind  the 
statue  and  the  choir  behind  the  geraniums.  He  performs.  Thunderous  applause 
and  several  encores.) 

150  voices — Just  too  divine! 

Horace — Is  there  anything  anyone  would  like  to  sing? 

Mr.  Surette — What  about  going  over  that  Bach  Chorale,  Mr.  Alwyne? 

Hor. — I'm  afraid  there  isn't  time,  Mr.  Surette.  It's  after  ten,  and  we  all  have 
to  go  home. 

Miss  Ely  (sotto  voce) — Bravo !     Bravo ! 

(And  the  curtain  falls  very  hastily.) 


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Mr.  and  Mrs.  Haddock  at  Bryn  Mawr 


M' 


"R.  AND  MRS.  HADDOCK,  with  little 
Mildred,  arrived  at  Bryn  Mawr  on  the 
1.15  from  Broad  Street,  and  had  a  lovely  ride, 
stopping  at  West  Philadelphia,  52nd  Street, 
Overbrook,  Merion,  Narberth,  Wynnewood, 
Ardmore,  and  Haverford,  before  they  finally 
reached  their  destination  which  was  Bryn 
Mawr.  Mr.  Haddock's  niece  had  invited 
them  to  visit  the  College,  for  she  wanted  to  ask 
Mr.  Haddock  to  donate  to  the  Endowment 
Fund,  anyhow. 

On  the  way  from  the  Bryn  Mawr  station, 
the  visitors  saw  a  rotund  Italian  who  had  a 
stand  on  which  was  candy,  apples,  gum  and 
peppermints — or  maybe  it  was  apples,  candy, 
peppermints  and  gum. 

"Candy,  apples,  gum  and  peppermints — 
anyt'ing  you  want",  said  the  Italian  to  our 
friends. 

"Your  stuff  looks  stale!"  said  little  Mildred, 
critically.  This  caused  the  Italian  to  faint,  for  it  was  the  first  time  anybody  had 
ever  stopped  to  answer  him. 

"Come,  Mildred,"  said  Mrs.  Haddock,  trying  to  distract  the  child's  attention. 
"Look,  here  are  some  college  girls!" 

Four  tall  young  women  with  slightly  soiled  tee  shirts  and  laundry  cases,  were 
approaching  rapidly  on  foot.  Each  young  woman's  head  was  tightly  wrapped  in  a 
colored  bandanna. 

"It's  a  college  fad,"  exclaimed  Mr.  Haddock's  niece,  noticing  her  uncle's 
surprised  looks,  and  hoping  that  bandannas  would  not  hurt  the  Endowment  Fund 
any. 

"But  why  should  they  wear  bathing  caps?"  asked  Mrs.  Haddock,  who  was  a 
little  old-fashioned. 

"Pour  le  sport,  I  suppose,"  said  little  Mildred  sarcastically.     She  was  a  little 
proud  of  her  French,  I'm  afraid,  for  she  was  a  bright  child  and  large  for  her  age. 
And  so  the  conversation  flowed  on  until  they  entered  Rockefeller  Arch. 
"My,   these  buildings  are  pretty!"   said  Mrs.   Haddock,   gazing  admiringly 
around  at  the  battlemented  and  ricocheted  towers. 

"Pseudo-Gothic,"  mused  little  Mildred  appraisingly.  "Pretentious,  I'd  call 
it."  But  fortunately  no  one  heard  her.  And  so  the  conversation  flowed  on  until 
they  reached  the  Library. 

"You  must  see  the  Library!"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece,  herding  the  family 
through  heavy  doors  and  up  a  wide  flight  of  steps.  They  emerged  in  a  large  room 
with  red  and  gold  rafters  and  a  terrible  echo.     This  reminded  Mr.  Haddock  of  a 


7(> 


place  he  had  seen  abroad  the  summer  before,  and  so  he  started  to  tell  a  long  anec- 
dote in  a  rather  rumbling  "Voice.     Immediately  heads  popped  over  the  tops  of  '1  e 

desks  and  shushed  him. 

"Sh-sh-sh,"  they  hissed  sibilantly.  Then  the  heads  saw  by  the  strained 
countenances  of  the  family  that  they  were  visitors,  and  so  withdrew  hastily,  so 
that  Mr.  Haddock  continued  his  anecdote  undisturbed. 

"This  is  a  portrait  of  Miss  Thomas  by  Sargent,"  said  the  niece,  pulling  aside 
some  faded  green  curtains. 

"Oh,"  said  Mrs.   Haddock. 

"Look,  Mildred,"  said  Mr.  Haddock,  hastily  drawing  Mildred  away  from  the 
fascinated  contemplation  of  a  lady  with  a  tremendous  lawn  jabot,  and  some  over- 
whelming red  roses.     "This  is  a  portrait  of  Miss  Thomas  by  Sargent." 

"Interesting,  if  true,"  remarked  Mildred.  "Mother,  how  do  you  suppose  that 
girl  over  there  keeps  her  stock — " 

"You  must  see  the  Cloisters,"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece,  nudging  little  Mildred 
rather  neatly  in  the  ribs.  And  so  the  conversation  flowed  on  until  they  went  down- 
stairs, and  came  out  into  a  large,  grassy  plot,  patronized  by  students  and  birds,  but 
rather  more  by  birds. 

"These  are  the  Cloisters",  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece. 

"The — what?"  asked  Mrs.  Haddock. 

"The  Cloisters,"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece. 

"Look,  Will,"  said  Mrs.  Haddock,  "these  are  the  Cloisters." 

"Look,  Mildred,  these  are  the  Cloisters,"  said  Mr.  Haddock  to  Mildred. 

"My,  they're  pretty,"  said  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Haddock. 

"Very  pretty — and  very  draughty,"  muttered  little  Mildred  from  between 
clenched  teeth.     But  evidently  her  cousin  had  not  heard  her,  for  she  only  said, 

"You  must  see  some  of  the  other  buildings." 

They  emerged  from  the  Cloisters,  and  started  to  walk  around  the  paths. 

"What's  the  atrocious  building  with  the  clock  and  the  tower?"  said  little 
Mildred. 

"That's  Taylor  Hall,"  snapped  Mr.  Haddock's  niece.  (Yes,  children,  I'm 
afraid  she  snapped.) 

"Fancy  that,"  said  little  Mildred,  "so  that's  Taylor  Hall  is  it"'     Ha.  ha,  ha!" 

Fortunately  her  attention  was  just  then  diverted  by  the  sight  of  Shandy,  the 
Dean's  dog,  which  came  up  gnawing  the  bone  of  the  last  visitor.  After  aiming  an 
unsuccessful  kick  at  him,  little  Mildred  rounded  Taylor  and  stopped  short. 

From  the  open  windows  of  Denbigh  came  the  sound  of  a  great  many  voices  all 
shouting  at  once.     Snatches  of  the  hubbub  floated  across  to  them. 

"Whom  do  you  want  to  nominate  for  the  Junk  Committee?"  boomed  Carrie's 
voice. 

"Yes!"  shrieked  some  voices. 

"Whee!"  shrieked  others. 

Mildred  listened  attentively  for  some  time,  and  then  turned  to  her  cousin. 

"Bedlam?"  she  asked  politely. 

"No,"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece.     "It's  1925  having  a  class  meeting." 

"Oh,"  said  little  Mildred,  well  satisfied. 


And  so  the  conversation  flowed  on  until  they  walked  past  Merion.  Mr. 
Haddock's  niece  propelled  the  family  rather  quickly  by  the  Hall,  for  she  was  afraid 
her  uncle  would  want  to  go  through  it,  and  she  thought  the  pictures  were  a  little 
naked,  even  for  one  who  had  gone  through  the  Louvre. 

So  she  called  their  attention  to  the  gymnasium. 

"This  is  the  gymnasium,"  she  said. 

"Look,  Will,  this  is  the  gymnasium,"  said  Mrs.  Haddock  to  Mr.  Haddock. 

"It  would  be  a  good-looking  building  if  it  didn't  have  that  red  rag  hanging 
from  the  roof,"  commented  little  Mildred,  pointing  to  '25's  crimson  banner  of 
flame.     But  again  her  remark  was  ignored. 

"And  now  I  want  you  to  come  to  my  room,  and  have  our  college  drink — mug- 
gle,"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece  gaily. 

"How  nice!"  said  Mrs.  Haddock,  and  even  little  Mildred  showed  interest. 
So  the  quartet  wended  its  way  through  dark  corridors,  decorated  with  fire-pails 
and  scuttling  kimona'd  figures,  until  they  came  to  the  scene  of  the  entertainment. 

This  was  a  typical  Bryn  Mawr  room.  A  bright  fire,  which  cost  $1  a  day,  and 
which  Mr.  Haddock's  niece  had  ordered  from  the  housekeeper  before  ten  that 
morning,  blazed  in  the  hearth.  Above  this,  the  banners  of  Haverford  and  Bryn 
Mawr  were  crossed  lovingly.  On  the  wall  hung  boxing-gloves,  snow-shoes,  moose- 
heads  and  other  boudoir  accessories,  and  ranged  neatly  on  the  table  were  all  the 
College  News'es  from  three  years  back,  with  a  copy  of  the  Lantern,  (also  from  three 
years  back.)  Above  the  window-seat  hung  a  red  lantern,  the  glass  of  which  was 
broken,  because  three  years  back,  Mr.  Haddock's  niece  had  been  in  choir,  and  before 
Christmas  the  choir  had  sung  Christmas  carols  at  the  Faculty,  and  Air.  Haddock's 
niece  had  dropped  her  lantern,  because  she  never  had  been  strong  after  the  scarlet 
fever  when  she  was  five  years  old.  So  that  is  why  the  glass  of  her  lantern 
was  broken. 

"What  are  those  round  things  with  the  different  colored  rags  tied  on  them?" 
asked  little  Mildred. 

"Whoops,  my  dear!"  said  Mr.  Haddock,  laughing  very  heartily. 

"Sit  down,"  said  Mr.  Haddock's  niece,  bustling  about,  and  preparing  to  open 
a  can  of  cow  with  the  fire-axe.     Soon  she  was  mixing  the  muggle. 

"My,  that  stuff  looks  terrible!"  said  little  Mildred,  watching  the  performance. 
Mr.  Haddock  wanted  to  reprove  his  daughter,  but  his  conscience  would  not  permit 
him,  for  indeed  the  stuff  did  look  terrible. 

Then  little  Mildred  tasted  the  brew,  and  looked  disappointed. 

"Don't  let  her  fool  you,  Daddy,"  she  whispered.  "It's  only  cocoa — and  not 
even  good  cocoa  at  that !" 

So  the  Haddock  family  balanced  their  cups  in  one  hand,  and  Mr.  Haddock's 
niece  plied  them  with  butter-thins  and  olivenaise,  and  looked  like  a  virgin  martyr, 
and  all  were  very  uncomfortable  indeed. 

Then  Mr.  Haddock's  niece  looked  even  more  like  a  virgin  martyr,  and  broached 
the  subject  of  the  Endowment  Fund,  and  Mr.  Haddock  said  of  course  he'd  be  glad 
to  donate,  being  a  good  member  of  the  Kiwanis  Club,  and  interested  in  all  kinds  of 
social  uplift  work,  and  so  he  wrote  out  a  very  comfortable  check  indeed. 

78 


Then  little  Mildred  saw  the  olivenaise  and  butter-thins  coming  around  for  the 
sixtli  time,  and  facetiously  said  that  she  wanted  to  go  home  on  the  Toonerville 
Trolley  again. 

"Thank  you  so  much.  We  have  had  a  wonderful  time!  1  certainly  did  like 
those — Cloisters,"  said  Mrs.  Haddock,  whose  feet  were  a  little  worn  out,  even 
though  she  did  wear  Ped-e-mode  shoes  like  the  lady  in  the  advertisement  in  her 
Ladies'  Home  Journal. 

"We  certainly  did!  Remember  me  to  all  the  girls!"  said  Mr.  Haddock  jovially, 
winking  behind  Mrs.  Haddock's  back,  for  he  had  been  indeed  what  is  called  a  gay 
dog  in  his  day. 

"Thank  you — for  practically  nothing,"  said  little  Mildred,  evading  her  cousin's 
finger  nails. 

And  so  Mr.  and  Mrs.  Haddock  and  little  Mildred  caught  the  4.38  to  town,  and 
after  a  lovely  ride  through  Haverford,  Ardmore,  Wynnewood,  Narberth,  Merion, 
Overbrook,  52nd  Street,  West  Philadelphia,  finally  landed  in  Broad  Street. 


79 


-   -* 

e 

s 

s 

< 

K— -- 

^Eb':=^=5 

1      [■&" 

1 

is 

J  IwQsr  \\     _^P 

F^P  s 

/    IV  YF  J 

Anderson,  Sarah 213  East  6Sth  St.,  New  York  City 

Austin,  Elizabeth  W.  (Mrs.  William  W.  Battles) 

250  South  18th  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
Baldwin,  Eleanor  de  F. 

Care  of  Henry  de  F.  Baldwin,  Esq.,  25  Broadway,  New  York  City 
31st  and  Thompson  Sts.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
4741  Kimbark  Ave.,  Chicago,  111. 
993  Park  Ave.,  New  York  City 
550  Seventh  St.,  Brooklyn.  N.  Y. 
1  1 1  Moreland  Ave.,  Chestnut  Hill,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
16  Helena  Ave.,  Larchmont,  N.  Y. 
16  Helena  Ave.,  Larchmont,  N.  Y. 
Henry  P.  Borie)  ....  Rydal,  Pa. 

725  Pine  St.,  Winnetka,  111. 

Wellsville,  N.  Y. 

.     West  245th  St.,  Riverdale,  New  York  City 
41  East  Main  St.,  Norristown,  Pa. 
Lawrence  Woods)  .  .  .  Berwyn,  Pa. 

1004  Cathedral  St.,  Baltimore,  Md. 
"Pilot  Town",  Lewes,  Del. 
Carr,  Margaret  L.   (Mrs.  Clark  Howell,  Jr.) 

110  East  Seventh  St.,  Atlanta,  Ga. 
Care  of  Mrs.  David  Castleman,  Lexington,  Ky. 


Baltz,  Rosemary  W. 

Barber,  Leila  C.  . 

Belo,  Jane  (Mrs.  George  Biddle) 

Blumenstock,  Madeleine 

Bonnell,  Mariana 

Boross,  Alys 

Boross,  Eugenia    . 

Boyd,  Lysbeth  K.  (Mrs. 

Boyden,  Margaret 

Bradley,  Elizabeth  W. 

Briggs,  Frances  E. 

Brown,  Miriam  G. 

Bulley,  Leonora  (Mrs. 

Carey,  Susan  S.     . 

Carpenter,  Virginia 


Castleman,  Mayo 
Chisolm,  Helen  S. 
Comer,  Elizabeth  M. 
Coney,  Harriet  C. 
Constant,  Maris  S. 


1337  Lexington  Ave.,  New  York  City 

431  State  Road,  Cynwyd,  Pa. 

7S  Alexander  St.,  Princeton,  N.  J. 

131  East  93rd  St.,  New  York  City. 


S7 


Coombs,  Josephine  M 
Cornish,  Hilda  K. 
Cox,  Nancy  L. 
Cummings,  Carol  L. 
Dean,  Elizabeth  C. 
Dodge,  Josephine  J. 
Dunn,  May  Morrill 
Dunn,  Wilhelmine 
Dunne,  Eleanor  C.    . 
du  Pont,  Natalie  W. 
Eberbach,  Marion 
Eicks,  Adelaide  M. 
Evans,  Elsie  L. 
Fiske,  Dorothy  B. 
Foster,  Rachel  A. 
Fowler,  Katharine  S.  . 
Fujita,  Taki 
Gardiner,  Margaret  E. 
Garrison,  Laura  B.  D. 
Gatchell,  Catharine  K 
Gates,  Gail  . 
Gehring,  Clara  L. 
Gessner,  Katherine 
Glessner,  Emily  F. 
Grayson,  Helen  S. 
Gregory,  Jean  L. 
Hale,  Mary  C. 
Hampton,  Ethelyn 
Hansen,  Mathilde  (Mrs 
Hayne,  Emily  P.    . 
Heller,  Ruth  A.   . 
Henshaw,  Helen  R. 
Hering,  Margaret  E 
Herrman,  Helen   . 


Scarsdale,  N.  Y. 

L806  Arch  St.,  Little  Rock,  Ark. 

226  North  15th  St.,  Kansas  City,  Kans. 

4252  Regent  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

Rangelly  Lodge,  West  Chester,  Pa. 

Devon  Hotel,  West  55th  St.,  New  York  City 

Ravenna,  Natchez,  Miss. 

965  East  Broad  St.,  Columbus,  Ohio 

3800  Fourteenth  St.,  N.  W.,  Apt.  112,  Washington,   D.  C. 

Box  303,  Wilmington,  Del. 
441  West  Stafford  St.,  Germantown,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

.    Lake  Drive,  Belmar,  N.  J. 

9  Grover  St.,  Auburn,  N.  Y. 

114  Brattle  St.,  Cambridge,  Mass. 

596  Maple  Ave.,  Winnetka,  111. 

140  Academy  Road,  North  Andover,  Mass. 

1463  Yoyogi,  Tokyo,  Japan 

53  Roberts  Ave.,  Haddonfield,  N.  J. 

1019  Clinton  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

239  West  21st  St.,  New  York  City 

Devon,  Pa. 

1 1427  Bellflower  Road,  Cleveland,  Ohio 

Montgomery  Ave.,  Ardmore,  Pa. 

Littleton,  N.  H. 

Lyme,  Conn. 

.     371  Bay  St.,  Toronto,  Canada 

1535  L  St.,  Washington,  D.  C. 

.     Box  1147,  Winter  Haven,  Fla. 

William  W.  Smith)    408  Lloyd  Ave.,  Providence,  R.  I. 

2508  St.  Charles  Ave.,  New  Orleans,  La. 

346  Mt.  Prospect  Ave.,  Newark,  N.  J. 

5  Douglas  Road,  Schenectady,  N.  Y. 

527  West  1 10th  St.,  New  York  City 

21  East  92nd  St.,  New  York  City 

147  East  Durham  St.,  Mt.  Airy,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


Higgins,  Grace 

Hill,  Blanche  Theodora  (Mrs.  T.  Hill) 

Care  of  Josiah  F.  Hill 

HlNKLEY,    ETHELINE    H.    . 

Hinton,  Christel  . 

Hough,  Helen  A.  . 

Kirk,  Helen  L. 

Lawrence,  Elizabeth  B 

Lee,  Dorothy  B.     Care  of  Elisha  Lee,  Esq. 

Ling,  Barbara  H. 

Care  of  E.  E.  Ling,  Esq.,  National  City  Bank  of  New  York 

Place,  London,  W.  I.,  England 


Esq.,  325  Beacon  St.,  Boston,  Mass. 

.    Eden  Hill,  Poughkeepsie,  N.  Y. 

102  Pleasant  St.,  Hinton,  W.  Va. 

152  East  35th  St.,  New  Ycrk  City 

502  Cathedral  St.,  Baltimore,  Md. 

3909  Locust  St.,  Philadelphia,  Penn. 

Broad  St.  Station,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


1 1   Waterloo 


SS 


33  \VV  I  51st  St.,  New  York  ' 
33  West  51st  St.,   New  York   ' 
528  East  Ridge  St.,  Marquette,  M 
.  4  East  66th  St..  New  York  ' 
42  North  Church  St.,  Carbondale,  lJ;i. 
24  I  West  73rd  St.,  New  York  City 
240  West  Chelten  Ave.,  Germantown,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
R.  P.  D.  I,  Box  126,  Norfolk,  Va. 


Lomas,  Elaine  M. 

Lomas,  Virginia  W. 

Lytle,  Maey  L.     . 

Macy,   Edytha  C.   (Mrs.  Burnham  Lewis) 

Malaun,  Elizabeth 

Mallett,  Elizabeth  G. 

McBride,  Katharine  E 

McCullough,  Virginia  C. 

Miller,  Constance         .  .  .  .     375  Park  Ave.,  New  York  City 

Mordock,  Katharine  (Mrs.  James  Adams)    3080  Jackson  .St.,  San  Francisco,*  al. 


Morton,  Rebecca  H. 

Mutch,  Mary  D.   . 

Nagle,  Marion  W. 

Nelson,  Dora  Belle 

Pantzer,  Adele  A. 

Parker,  Alice  L.  . 

Pickrell,  Genevieve  Care  of  Dr.  A 

Pierce,  Margaret  H.     . 

Potts,  Helen 

Potts,  Helen  D.      425 

Quarles,  Caroline  S.    . 

Remak,  Caroline  V. 

Roberts,  Nell  R. 

Sabin,  Helen  Yvonne 

St.  John,  Eleanor  V.    . 

Saunders,  Olivia   . 

Schoonover,  Janetta  W. 

Sears,  Olive 

Shipley,  Dorothea  C. 

Ellet  Lane  and  Wissahickon  Ave 
Shiras,  Anne  McD. 

H 


1429  Woodlawn  Ave.,  Wilmington,  Del. 

Montgomery  Ave.,  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa. 

1  HI  Windsor  St.,  Reading,  Pa. 

Planta  Electrica  Tallepiedra,  Havana,  Cuba 

717  Middle  Drive,  Woodruff  Place,  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

314  Scotland  Read,  South  Orange,  N.  J. 

E.  Sterne,  1834  E.  10th  St.,  Indianapolis,  Ind. 

.    ISO  Mercer  St.,  Princeton,  N.  J. 

2729  Pine  Grove  Ave.,  Chicago,  111. 

West    Walnut    Lane,    Germantown,    Philadelphia,    Pa. 

222  Prospect  Ave.,  Milwaukee,  Wis. 

Chestnut  Hill,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

1454  South  Second  St.,  Louisville,  Ky. 

3900  Shenandoah  Ave.,  Highland  Park,  Dallas,  Tex. 

220  Farmington  Ave.,  Hartford,  Conn. 

Clinton,  N.  Y. 

176  West  State  St.,  Trenton,  N.  J. 

Prospect  St.,  Framingham  Center,  Mass. 


Shumway,  Margaret 
Smith,  Elizabeth  L. 
Smith,  Helen  L.     . 
Sollers,  Dorothy 
Speicher,  Elizabeth  S. 
Starr,  Katharine  E. 
Steers,  Etta  Mary 
Steinmetz,  Katherine    . 
Stewardson,  Margaret 
Stewart,  Ethel  (Mrs,  Trevor 
Stillwell,  Madge  S. 
Stolzenbach,  Christine  R. 
Tate,  Florence  P. 
Tinker,  Dorothy  C. 
Voorhees,  Louise  V. 


Hill) 


Mt.  Airy,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

4841  Ellsworth  Ave.,  Pittsburgh,  Pa. 

7  Elliot  Ave.,  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa. 

Lee,  Mass. 

Tekoa  Terrace,  Westfield,  Mass. 

.     1407  John  St.,  Baltimore,  Md. 

Somerset,  Pa. 

5  West  54th  St.,  New  York  City 

37  East  67th  St.,  New  York  City 

6 IS  Stockley  Gardens,  Norfolk,  Va. 

.    2013  Pine  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 

1  Washington  Sq.,  New  York  City 

East  Bradley  Lane,  Chevy  Chase,  Md. 

253  Thorn  St.,  Sewickley,  Pa. 

5  Regent  Circle,  Brookline,  -Mass. 

20  South  11th  St.,  Allentown,  Pa. 

137  East  60th  St.,  New  York  City 


S9 


Walton,  Edith  H. 
Waterbury,  Nancy  L. 
Watts,  Emily  P. 

The  Miller  Stile  Inn, 
Whitcomb,  Merle 
White,  Mary  Louise 
Williams,  Eleanor  G. 
Wilson,  Elizabeth  M. 
Winthrop,  Ruth  M. 

WOODWORTH,    ALLEGRA 


440  Park  Ave. 
132  East  38th  St. 


New  York  City 
New  York  City 


Quincy,  Mass.  or  Care  of  H.  M.  Watts,  Esq.,  Ogontz,  Pa. 
.     •     .  .  .       Common  St.,  Dedham,  Mass. 

The  Lenox,  13th  and  Spruce  Sts.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 
.    220  Sixteenth  Ave.,  North,  Yakima,  Wash. 
.     2745  Hampshire  Road,  Cleveland  Heights,  Ohio 
847  Summit  Grove  Ave.,  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa'. 
.      2014  North  Carlisle  St.,  Philadelphia,  Pa. 


90 


■^■■■BMHH 

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flR|e^4: 

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Hff       -^^M>      * 

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I^N 

Br'    "*■+ 

IK 

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ra^'  ' 

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H  3g 

; 

■j£[l 

Sarah  Anderson 


Eleanor  Baldwin 


Leila  Barker 


Madeleine  Bldmenstock 


Mariana  Bonnell 


Alys  Boross 


Eugenia  Boross 


Margaret  Boyden 


Elizabeth  Bradley 


Frances  Eriggs 


Miriam  Brown 


Si  s\x  Caret 


Virginia  Carpenter 


Mayo  Castleman 


Helen  Chisolm 


HHUBH 

Elizabeth  Comer 


Chistina  Coney 


Mauls  Constant 


Hilda  Cornish 


Elizabeth  Dean 


May  Morrill  Dunn 


WlLHELMINE    DnNN 


Xatalie  du  Pont 


Marion  Eberbach 


Adelaide  Eicks 


Elsie  Evans 


Marjorie  Ferguson 


Rachel  Foster 


Katharine  Fowler 


Taki  Fugita 


Margaret  Gardiner 


Laura  Garrison 


Catharine  (Iati  ihell 


(  Iail  '  Sates 


Clara  Gehrixi; 


Emily  Glessxer 


Helen  Grayson 


Jean  Gregory 


Mary  Hale 


Kthelyn  Hampton 


Helen  Henshaw 


Helen  Herrman 


Etheline  Hinki.ky 


Christel  Hinton 


Helen  Hough 


Elizabeth  Lawrence 


Dorothy  Lee 


Barbara  Ling 


Elaine  Lomas 


Virginia  Lomas 


Mary  Lytle 


Elizabeth  Malaun 


Elizabeth  Mallett 


Katharine  McBride 


Marion  Nagle 


Adele  Pantzer 


Alice  Parker 


Margaret  Pierce 


Helen  D.  Potts 


Caroline  Quarles 


Caroline  Remak 


Nell  Roberts 


Olivia  Saunders 


Janetta  Schoonover 


Dorothea  Shipley 


Margaret  Shumway 


Elizabeth  Smith 


Helex  Smith 


Dorothy  Sollers 


Margaret  Stewardson 


Eleanor  St.  John 


Christine  Stolzenbach 


Dorothy  Tinker 


Edith  Walton 


Emily  Watte 


Merle  Whitcomb 


Elizabeth  Wilson 


Ruth  Wintiirop 


Allegha  Woodworth 


MM'KN'DIX 


^Appendix  has  been  removed. 

Ill 


// 


You're  ;i  beli eve r  in  out- 
door sports — and  in  healthy 
recreation — then  it's  safe  to 
say  you're  a  SPALDING  en- 
thusiast. 

Send  for  a  Catalogue  of  Material 
far  all  Sports  in  season. 

1210  Chestnut  St.      -       Pkiladelp 


Thresher  Bros, 

The  Specialty  Silk  Store 
L320  Chestnul  Streel 

PHILADELPHIA 

If  it  is  Silks  or  Velvets,  you 
will  find  il  at  Thresher's,  and 
usually  at  a  lower  price — the 
same  qualities  as  can  be  found 
elsewhere. 

Samples  mailed  Kptm  request. 


IV' 


BOSTON   CLEVELAND   BALTIMORE 


Jeannett's  Bryn  Mawr 
Flower  Shop 

Flowers  for  Commencement 


807  Lancaster  Ave.,  Bryn  Mawr,  Pa. 
Telephone  570 


11.3 


DeArmond  &  Co. 

Upholstery  Goods 

Window  Shades,  Awning  Stripes 

Cabinet  Hardware 

Both  Telephones 
930  ARCH  ST.         PHILADELPHIA,   PA. 

John  J.  McDevitt 

PRINTING 

03 

Programs,  Bill  Heads,  Tickets 

Letter  Heads,  Announcements 

Booklets,  etc. 

114  I  ancaster,  Ave.                Rosemont,  Pa. 

The  Toggery  Shop 

Chas.  Snyder,  Proprietor 

Gowns,  Hats,  Coats,  Sweaters, 

Blouses,  Hosiery 

Sole  agents  fur 

Vanity  Fair  Silk  Hosiery 

French  Dry  Cleaning  and  Dyeing 
831  LANCASTER  AVENUE 

Phono  Bryn  Mawr  131 

Chatter-On  Tea  House 

Luncheon      Afternoon  Tea 
Dinner 
Open  Sundays 

Tel.  Bryn  Mawr  118.5     835  Morton  Road 

M.  M.  Gaffney 

Dry  Goods  and  Notions 

School  Supplies 
28  BRYN  MAWR  AVENUE 

Afternoon  Tea  and  Luncheon 

may  be  had  at  the 

Cottage  Tea  Room 

Montgomery  Avenue 
Bryn  Mawr 

Everything  Dainty  and  Delicious 

Edw.   K.  Tryon   Co. 

Philadelphia's  Leading 

Sporting  Goods 

Store 

■ 

912  CHESTNUT  STREET 

"Look  for  the  Green  Canoe" 

William  L.  Hayden 

Hardware 

Curtain  Rods,  Paints.  Brushes 

838  Lancaster  Avenue,    Bryn  Mawr,  Pa. 

110 


I.  Miller  < 


Beautiful  Shoes 


1 1     —i- 


1«2"25  Chestnut  Street 


ESTABLISHED  1010 


(  <   i  a  ^-rtwm^Hjj  ) 

[fjfcrnf  lent  en's    ^urnisljittg  'C/ooiiB, 

.MADISON  AVENUE  COP.  FORTY-FOURTH  STREET 
NEW  YORK 


Gifts  for 
Men 

& 
Boys 


BOSTON     PALM  BEACH     NEWPORT 

LITTLE    BUILDING        PLAZA    BUILDING         AUDRAIN   BUILDING 


Karcher  &  Rehn  Co. 


Interior  Decoration  and  Furniture 

Our  showrooms  are  filling  up  with  new  arrivals  of 

selected  furniture  which  will  appeal  to  those 

who  discriminate  in  favor  of 

the  beautiful 


1608-10  Chestnut  Street 


Philadelphia,  Pa. 


iri 


J.  J.  Connelly  Estate 

The  Main  Line 

FLORISTS 

Telephone,  Bryn  Mawr  252 
IHG  Lancaster  Ave.,    Rosemont,  Pa. 


William  H.  Ramsey 
&  Son 

High  Grade  Groceries 


Bryn  Mawr  843 


£A 


flJ 


Jewelers 

Silversmiths 

Stationery 
Established  1832 

Philadelphia 


<b 


The  quality  commensurate  with  the 
importance  of 

RINGS 

Charms  and  School 
Trophies 

Correspondence  invited 


Henry  B.Wallace 

Caterer  and  Confectioner 


Telephone,  Bryn  Mawr  758 
22-24  Bryn  Mawr  Ave.     -     Bryn  Mawr.  Pa. 
127  North  Wayne  Ave.     -       -       Wayne,  Pa. 


Les  Silhouettes  Tea  House 


LINCOLN  HIGHWAY 


ROSEMONT,  PA. 


Open  from  twelve  o'clock  noon  until  seven- 
t  hirty  p.  m.  to  serve 

Luncheon — Tea — Dinner 

Arrangements  may  be  made  for  special  luncheon  and 
dinner  parties.     Telephone  Bryn  Mawr  113(i 


ARDMORE 

BALA 


OVERBROOK 

NARBERTH 


Wm.  T.  Mclntyre 

Fancy  Groceries     City  Dressed  Meat 
Confectioner  and  Caterer 

Own  Make  Candy,  Ice  Cream 
Fancy  Groceries 

821  LANCASTER  AVE.,     BRYN  MAWR 


Ok 

Chatter  Box 

Oea 
Room 


THE 

Chatter  Box 

A  Delightful 
Tea  Room 


Dinners  by  Appointment 

Open  from  twelve  to  seven-thirty 
Tel.  Bryn  Mawr  453        825  LANCASTER  AVE. 


118 


"Beautiful  "Pyralin  in  Materials 
of  Lasting  Vogue 

yf  MBER  PYRALIN,  Shell  Pyralin,  Ivory  Pyralin,  or  the 
-*  •*  delightful  combinations  of  Pearl  on  Amber,  Ivory  on 
Amber,  and  Shell  on  Amber — these  are  the  materials  which 
beauty,  utility  and  good  taste  have  decreed — and  fashion  followed. 

Get  a  complete  set  by  all  means,  if  you  can — if  not,  you  can 
get  a  few  pieces  now  and  complete  the  set  later — for  added 
pieces  to  match  can  always  be  obtained  at  the  leading  stores 
anywhere. 

Descriptive  booklet  on  request 

E.  I.  du  Pont  de  Nemours  &  Co.,  Inc. 

Pyralin  Department 
21  East  40th  Street,  New  York,  N.Y. 


S 


119 


INSURANCE 

Fire  or  Burglary  Insurance  on  students'  per- 
sonal effects  while  at  college  or  elsewhere. 

Tourists'  Floating  Insurance  on  personal  effects 
against  all  risks  in  transit,  in  hotels,  etc., 
both  in  this  country  and  abroad. 

Automobile  Insurance  covering  damage  to  car 
and  liability  for  damage  to  property  or  for 
injuries  to  persons. 

LONGACRE  &  EWING 

1  +  1  S.  Fourth  St.,  Bullitt  Bldg.,  Philadelphia 


Why  Not  Discriminate? 

When  having  fine 
GARMENTS  CLEANED  OR  DYED 


Courteous  and  prompt  service  at 

The  Main  Line  Valet  Shop 

REMODELING  AND  REPAIRING 
ladies'  Riding  Suits  to  measure  Hi 5 0  up 


^°Hv 


O  G 
Bonwit  Teller  &  Co. 


fhe/-hwt  S\ree\ 
Philadelphia 


Compliments  of  a  Friend 


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Compliments  of 
A  Friend 


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Sandwiches 

for  Picnics 


ICED   DRINKS 


College  Tea  House 

Open  Daily  from  1  to  7 
Evening  Parties  by  Special  Arrangement 


Strawbridge  &  Clothier 

BARBARA  LEE  FROCKS 
That  Are  Fashion 

Expressive  of  youth   with   just 
that  dash  of  sophistication  that 
is  the  mode 


Barbara  Lee  Dresses  are  sold  in  Philadelphia  exclusively  at 
STRAWBRIDGE   &   CLOTHIER'S 


1-21 


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7/ieWll  Photo-Engraving  Co. 

Lomtedrntkheartof Philadelphia's 'business  center v 


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QUALITY  ENGRAVINGS 

and  prompt  deliveryhavebuiltforus  one  of  the  most  com- 
plete engraving  and  art  establishments  in  the  east.  Courtesy 
co-operation  and  personal  interest  in  our  customers  are 
additional  inducements  we  offer  in  return  foryour  business. 

7/k>L0TZ  Photo-Engraving  Co. 

N.E. COR.  12T?  and  CHERRY  STS.  PH  I  LADELPHIA,  PA. 


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Eagle  Printing 
and  Binding  Co. 


OUR  SPECIALTY 

IS  PRINTING  FOR 

SCHOOLS  AND 

COLLEGES 


Flat  iron  Building       Eagle  Square 

Pittsfield,  Massachusetts 

We  Printed  and  Bound 
This  Book 


1*3 


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